Ann Braithwaite - jazzreview.com - Your Jazz Music Connection - jazzreview.com - Your Jazz Music Connection http://jazzreview.com Mon, 22 May 2017 14:14:45 -0500 Joomla! - Open Source Content Management en-gb Rising Piano Star Romain Collin Introduces Melodically Captivating Sound-Sculpted Trio Project On His Palmetto Debut "The Calling" http://jazzreview.com/jazz-news/press-releases/rising-piano-star-romain-collin-introduces-melodically-captivating-sound-sculpted-trio-project-on-his-palmetto-debut-the-calling.html http://jazzreview.com/jazz-news/press-releases/rising-piano-star-romain-collin-introduces-melodically-captivating-sound-sculpted-trio-project-on-his-palmetto-debut-the-calling.html "A visionary composer, an extraordinary jazz pianist and a very bright young rising star in the jazz world." — Jon Weber, host of NPR's PianoJazz French-born pianist Romain Collin introduces an evocatively textured, melodically luxuriant sound on his new Palmetto album The Calling, slated for release on April 24, 2012. Flowing from his singular creative path as a classically trained musician besotted with jazz giants like Errol Garner, Oscar Peterson, Keith Jarrett and Bud Powell, his music is utterly idiosyncratic, yet fully part of a generational zeitgeist informed by indie rock and adventurous pop music. Building upon his highly responsive…

"A visionary composer, an extraordinary jazz pianist and a very bright young rising star in the jazz world." — Jon Weber, host of NPR's PianoJazz

 

French-born pianist Romain Collin introduces an evocatively textured, melodically luxuriant sound on his new Palmetto album The Calling, slated for release on April 24, 2012. Flowing from his singular creative path as a classically trained musician besotted with jazz giants like Errol Garner, Oscar Peterson, Keith Jarrett and Bud Powell, his music is utterly idiosyncratic, yet fully part of a generational zeitgeist informed by indie rock and adventurous pop music.

 

Building upon his highly responsive trio with bassist Luques Curtis and drummer Kendrick Scott, Collin has crafted a ravishing body of music featuring subtly textured flourishes added in post-production. An eagerly awaited follow-up to his acclaimed 2008 debut, The Calling is a quantum leap for Collin, a highly personal statement that embraces the musical currents that move him most deeply.

 

"My music ultimately focuses on solid writing and composition, on group improvisation and creating a distinct mood and atmosphere that listeners can lose themselves in," says Collin, 32. "When I'm improvising, I try to improvise within a specific piece of music as a real extension of the melody so it's an integral part of the piece."

 

Walking an unorthodox path requires finding the right collaborators. Collin has hit the jackpot. At 28, Curtis is one of the most sought after young bassists in New York City, a superlative accompanist who has already recorded with masters such as Eddie Palmieri, Brian Lynch, Christian Scott, Sean Jones, Gary Burton, and Dave Valentin. Scott is best known for his six-year stint with Terence Blanchard, but he also worked widely with heavyweights like Herbie Hancock, John Scofield, Maria Schneider, Wayne Shorter, Robert Glasper, Angelique Kidjo, Lionel Loueke, and Gretchen Parlato.

 

Produced by studio maestro Matt Pierson, who has helped shape albums by jazz's most distinctive artists (including Brad Mehldau, Joshua Redman, Taylor Eigsti and Mark Turner), The Calling features 10 Collin originals and his seductive arrangements of John Mayer's "Stop This Train" and Horace Silver's classic "Nica's Dream." Rather than demonstrating the trio's versatility with an eclectic array of grooves and structures, Collin has crafted a highly cohesive program that explores similar emotional terrain from a variety of perspectives.

 

The album opens with "Storm," a tempestuous piece that briskly establishes Collin's aural agenda. Rather than serving as a launching pad for solos, the tune sweeps through a series of overcast spaces, moods enhanced by the almost subliminal laying of processed vocals, keyboards and electric guitar. Rather than clearing the air, "Storm" gives way to the album's title track, an insistent, almost incantatory minimalist theme that builds to an ambiguously pacific resolution.

 

Reflecting his engagement with pop music and singer/songwriters, Collin decided to arrange "Stop This Train" just a few days before the recording session. Encouraged to tackle the piece by Pierson, he passed it out to the trio and ended up with a lovely rendition that stands as one of the album's highlights. If "Train" finds Collin with his heart on his sleeve, the angular "Pennywise the Clown" captures the pianist as trickster. With its mercurial stop and start melody, the piece makes multiple head fakes, showcasing Scott's exquisite trap set touch and inherent sense of structure.

 

Equally revelatory is Collin's haunting arrangement of "Nica's Dream." Reharmonizing the opening section, he maintains the spirit of the original while turning it into his own unsettling tale. He closes the album with the

rueful "One Last Try," a solo piano excursion where half-hearted optimism gives way to resignation. It's another unexpected move on an album that constantly leaves listeners checking their emotional bearings. For Collin, The Calling is much more a notebook than a manifesto. "It's not about a concept, it's just the sounds that made me feel good and I want to hear," he says. "The music doesn't come from a rational process, it's mainly the result of a combination of sounds from different genres."

 

While Collin's music reflects his unique vision, it can be seen as part of a sensibility shared by players like James Farm pianist Aaron Parks, saxophonist Tim Green, and pianist Robert Glasper. He's forged particularly close ties with like-minded contemporaries such as trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire, saxophonist Walter Smith III and vibraphonist Chris Dingman, who all performed together internationally while earning a Masters Degree at the prestigious Thelonious Monk Institute.

 

Born in Cannes and raised in the nearby southeastern town of Antibes, Collin soaked up jazz at home listening to his mother's Oscar Peterson, Duke Ellington and Ella Fitzgerald albums. But he was also widely exposed to jazz via the celebrated Jazz à Juan festival, which featured many of the music's greatest improvisers.

 

"My house was five minutes from the jazz festival, so I got to see a lot of that growing up," Collin says. "I was studying classical music. As a young kid, I was always curious about jazz and improvised music."

 

He performed with a pop and rock band in high school, but with no jazz program and few peers interested in jazz, he had no one to explore the music with in person. When the time came to start college at 17, Collin honored his parents' wishes and enrolled in an international management program in the UK. But his love of music won out. "I always felt a need to listen constantly every day, and play whenever I could," Collin says. Upon discovering new practice rooms with good pianos "I was playing six to eight hours a day, and that's what I've been doing ever since."

 

It might sound like a formula for flunking out, but class attendance was optional as long as Collin kept up with assignments and tested well (which he did with some intensive cramming). He made enough progress at the piano to earn a full scholarship to Berklee, relocating to Boston in 2001. While he studied performance with masters like Dave Liebman and Joe Lovano, Collin majored in Music Synthesis, learning about sound design and synthesizer programming.

 

"I didn't want to be a jazz or performance major, I knew I'd be shedding eight hours a day anyway. I did the same thing in business school, kind of going to classes, doing okay, but mostly doing my own thing. I was never a tech geek, just wanted to get whatever information I needed."

 

He quickly put his skills to use, co-producing the critically acclaimed album Moving by Hiromi's Sonic Bloom bassist Tony Grey (one track, "White Woods," appeared on a Weather Report tribute album).  Graduating in three years, Collin moved to New York City, but he almost immediately got the call to audition for the Monk Program. Selected by a panel including Herbie Hancock, Terence Blanchard and Wayne Shorter, he moved to Los Angeles for the two-year program, joining a prodigious cast of peers.

 

"Terence tried to have us compose as much as we could," Collin says. "He really stressed the importance of having a sense of focus, a theme that's always present through a piece."

 

His heralded debut album The Rise and Fall of Pipokuhn featured bassist Joe Sanders and drummer Zach Harmon, fellow Monk Institute alumni. Since moving back to New York City in 2009, he's gained recognition as a singular artist, "a visionary composer, an extraordinary jazz pianist and a very bright young rising star in the jazz world," in the words of Jon Weber, the host of NPR's PianoJazz.

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http://www.romaincollin.com

 HYPERLINK "http://www.palmetto-records.com" www.palmetto-records.com

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Ann Braithwaite) Press Releases Wed, 22 Feb 2012 11:23:41 -0600
Trumpeter/Composer Wadada Leo Smith Presents World Premiere of Civil Rights Opus “Ten Freedom Summers” with Golden Quartet and Southwest Chamber Music http://jazzreview.com/jazz-news/press-releases/trumpeter/composer-wadada-leo-smith-presents-world-premiere-of-civil-rights-opus-ten-freedom-summers-with-golden-quartet-and-southwest-chamber-music.html http://jazzreview.com/jazz-news/press-releases/trumpeter/composer-wadada-leo-smith-presents-world-premiere-of-civil-rights-opus-ten-freedom-summers-with-golden-quartet-and-southwest-chamber-music.html “Ten Freedom Summers” is a collaboration between Smith’s celebrated Golden Quartet featuring pianist/composer Anthony Davis, bassist John Lindberg and drummer Susie Ibarra, and the acclaimed Southwest Chamber Music ensemble conducted by Grammy Award-winner Jeff von der Schmidt. The musicians will record the project in the days after the premiere for release on Cuneiform in the spring of 2012. In designing the sprawling multi-movement work, Smith focused on the formative decade framed by the landmark 1954 Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education that overturned the notorious Plessy v. Ferguson decision ratifying Jim Crow segregation, and the passage of the…

Trumpeter/Composer Wadada Leo Smith Presents World Premiere of Civil Rights Opus

“Ten Freedom Summers” with Golden Quartet and Southwest Chamber Music

 

Multi-Media Event October 28 – 30 at the

REDCAT Theater in the Walt Disney Concert Hall Complex, Los Angeles

 

Pre-concert discussion to include Smith, Southwest Chamber Music & Facing History and Ourselves

 

A child of the South who was raised in the red-hot crucible of the civil rights movement, Wadada Leo Smith has long contemplated creating an epic-scale opus exploring the struggle for African-American freedom and equality. With the three-night world premiere of “Ten Freedom Summers” at the REDCAT Theater in the Walt Disney Concert Hall Complex, Los Angeles on October 28-30, the visionary trumpeter and composer delivers his masterwork, a vivid, spiritually charged musical tapestry that celebrates the movement’s heroes and the turbulent era’s milestones, while also posing philosophical questions about the nature of democracy and equality. 

 

“Ten Freedom Summers” is a collaboration between Smith’s celebrated Golden Quartet featuring pianist/composer Anthony Davis, bassist John Lindberg and drummer Susie Ibarra, and the acclaimed Southwest Chamber Music ensemble conducted by Grammy Award-winner Jeff von der Schmidt. The musicians will record the project in the days after the premiere for release on Cuneiform in the spring of 2012. In designing the sprawling multi-movement work, Smith focused on the formative decade framed by the landmark 1954 Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education that overturned the notorious Plessy v. Ferguson decision ratifying Jim Crow segregation, and the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which outlawed many forms of racial discrimination.

 

"I was born in 1941 and grew up in segregated Mississippi and experienced the conditions which made it imperative for an activist movement for equality,” says Smith, who is marking his 70th birthday with his most ambitious undertaking. “It was in that same environment that I had my first dreams of becoming a composer and performer.”

 

More than a three-night musical premiere, “Ten Freedom Summers” is a multimedia project that incorporates archival news footage and evocative but abstract cinematic imagery edited with a self-consciously musical sensibility. The production was inspired conceptually by August Wilson’s Pulitzer Prize-winning 10-play Pittsburgh Cycle, in which each play chronicles a decade of African-American life in the 20th century. Beyond being a passionate fan of Wilson’s work, Smith feels a deep personal connection to his plays as he provided the transcription of a 1920s Fletcher Henderson piece and contributed trumpet work to the original 1982 production of “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom,” a score created by saxophonist Dwight Andrews (a member of Smith’s ensemble New Dalta Akhri who went on to collaborate frequently with Wilson).

 

“I own all 10 of Wilson’s plays and have studied them over the years,” Smith says. “Much like Wilson, what I’m trying to do is give a full impression, show the psychological transformation that America achieved. Each piece has its own motivation, and what ties it together is the psychological thread. Rather than taking 10 decades, I took 10 freedom summers.”


 

The REDCAT premiere is the culmination of more than three decades of intermittent work, study and contemplation. Smith has divided the 18 movements into three thematic collections, “Defining Moments in America,” “What is Democracy?” and “Ten Freedom Summers.” With movements dedicated to the indomitable Mississippi Freedom Democracy Party leader Fannie Lou Hamer, the brutally slain teenager Emmett Till, and Montgomery bus boycott catalyst Rosa Parks, the first collection could just as easily be called “Heroes and Martyrs” as “Defining Moments.”

 

 

 

Rather than offering answers, Smith further elaborated on his query “What is Democracy?” with movements exploring the Dred Scott decision and the nature of citizenship, the Sept. 11 attacks, and the assassination of NAACP field secretary Medgar Evers, who inspired the earliest piece included in the project (which Smith completed in 1977).  The eponymous third collection keys into events that Smith vividly recalls, including the Freedom Riders, the Little Rock crisis, and Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination in Memphis. 

 

 

 

“I saw that stuff happening,” Smith says. “Those are the moments that triggered this. I wrote those pieces as a way to fulfill and express what was inside of me.”

 

 

 

Smith composed two movements during a Djerassi Foundation residency and five pieces during his 2009/2010 Fellowship with the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation. Funded by the James Irvine Foundation and Clarence E. Heller Charitable Foundation, Southwest Chamber Music commissioned four compositions. Smith also received major support from Chamber Music America with support from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation.

 

 

 

For Southwest Chamber Music, “Ten Freedom Summers” follows its unprecedented "Ascending Dragon Music Festival,” the largest cultural exchange ever between the U.S. and Vietnam. Exhausted at the end of the project last year, Jeff von der Schmidt hadn’t planned on jumping into another major undertaking. But once he started talking with Smith about his participation in the ensemble’s 25th anniversary season, von der Schmidt realized that he had another singular opportunity to forge new creative ground. 

 

 

 

“I had finished the project of a career, and here Wadada hits me with one that’s just as rich, a major statement about the civil rights movement,” Von der Schmidt says. “I’ve been blown over by the epic scope. This is an African-American Ring Cycle, three evenings, each bound up with the next. It’s his vision, and it flows from his worldview and experiences. Remember, the Tallahatchie River, where they dumped Emmett Till’s body, runs through the town where he grew up.”

 

 

 

Born and raised in Leland, Mississippi, Wadada Leo Smith got his start playing trumpet in R&B bands, and by the mid 1960s had gravitated to Chicago’s burgeoning avant-garde jazz community. An early member of the seminal AACM collective, he collaborated with a dazzling cast of fellow visionaries, including Leroy Jenkins, Anthony Braxton, Henry Threadgill, Anthony Davis and Oliver Lake. On faculty at Cal Arts since 1993, he has influenced several generations of improvisers and composers.

 

 

 

Recording prolifically over the past two decades, Smith released an acclaimed series of albums with guitarist Henry Kaiser inspired by the early 1970s fusion of Miles Davis. Since he founded the Golden Quartet with Jack DeJohnette, Anthony Davis, and Malachi Favors the group has undergone several incarnations, featuring prodigious young players such as pianists Vijay Iyer and Angelica Sanchez. His latest release is a captivating, avant funk double album by his Organic orchestra, “Heart’s Reflections” (Cuneiform Records).

 

 

 

While Smith is known for his beautifully rendered graphic scores, he composed “Ten Freedom Summers” using traditional notation. Though true to his status as one of American music’s most inventive composers, Smith’s notation requires unusual discipline and improvisational skills.


 

Time is determined when you play the piece,” Smith says. “It liberates the player from having to count things. Everybody has the entire score, their parts and everybody else’s. It is traditional notation with five lines to a staff, but it’s a far cry from someone conducting a downbeat and moving across the score. It’s a lot of responsibility, but that’s what makes the world go round.”

 

 

 

Southwest Chamber Music is no stranger to Smith’s music. The ensemble performed two of his string quartets widely in 2000, and developed a lasting relationship with Smith. An ensemble of 15 musicians based in Los Angeles, the organization was founded in 1987 by Artistic Director Jeff von der Schmidt and Executive Director Jan Karlin. One of the most active chamber music ensembles in the United States, Southwest performs year round, provides educational programs, tours internationally, and has recorded 25 albumswhich have received two Grammy Awards and seven nominations. When von der Schmidt approached Smith about a possible commission for the ensemble’s 25th season, he raised the possibility of something more ambitious.

 

 

 

“I asked them to come out to my house and showed them how far ‘Ten Freedom Summers’ had gotten,” Smith says. “We spent four hours with scores all over the floor and table. I had no idea who would ever mount such a large collection.”

 

 

 

In an historic collaboration, von der Schmidt and Southwest Chamber Music have risen to the challenge. After decades of being revered by his peers and colleagues, Smith is attaining his rightful place at the forefront of American music. “Every ensemble is like a planet in the cosmos,” Smith has said, and with “Ten Freedom Summers” he has created a startlingly detailed universe that reflects upon the essence of what it means to be American, and what it means to be human.

 

 

 

 

 

TEN FREEDOM SUMMERS CONCERT INFORMATION:

 

 

 

Friday, October 28, 2011     Ten Freedom Summers, Part One    

 

8:30 p.m.

 

 

 

Saturday, October 29, 2011            Ten Freedom Summers, Part Two    

 

8:30 p.m.

 

 

 

Sunday, October 30, 2011   Ten Freedom Summers, Part Three

 

7 p.m.

 

 

 

Tickets: $38 each evening general admission; $28 each evening for students/CalArts Faculty/Staff, http://www.redcat.org/event/ten-freedom-summers  (213) 237-2800.

 

 

 

Facing History and Ourselves, an international organization dedicated to fighting racism, anti-Semitism and bigotry through education, will participate in a pre-concert discussion that will provide context for the performance.  They'll also work with Southwest Chamber Music and Smith to bring this piece to schools. The organization has extensive resources that look at the role of individuals and their choices in the history of the civil rights movement.

 

 

 

www.wadadaleosmith.com

 

www.swmusic.org

 

 

 

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Ann Braithwaite) Press Releases Thu, 15 Sep 2011 13:12:22 -0500
Marcus Shelby’s Soul of the Movement http://jazzreview.com/jazz-news/press-releases/marcus-shelbys-soul-of-the-movement.html http://jazzreview.com/jazz-news/press-releases/marcus-shelbys-soul-of-the-movement.html Check out the new video of the Marcus Shelby Orchestra live in concert, presenting snippets of an electrifying performance at Yoshi’s in San Francisco, CA. It features the music of Shelby’s acclaimed project, “Soul of the Movement: Meditations on Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.” For Marcus Shelby, history breathes music. Over the past decade, the San Francisco bassist/composer has created a series of captivating large-scale works that illuminate the accomplishments, spiritual fortitude and tribulations of African-Americans. In his debut recording for Porto Franco Records, Shelby delivers his breathtaking meditation on the Civil Rights movemen...
Check out the new video of the Marcus Shelby Orchestra live in concert, presenting snippets of an electrifying performance at Yoshi’s in San Francisco, CA. It features the music of Shelby’s acclaimed project, “Soul of the Movement: Meditations on Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.”

For Marcus Shelby, history breathes music. Over the past decade, the San Francisco bassist/composer has created a series of captivating large-scale works that illuminate the accomplishments, spiritual fortitude and tribulations of African-Americans. In his debut recording for Porto Franco Records, Shelby delivers his breathtaking meditation on the Civil Rights movement, “Soul of the Movement,” a powerful record mixing original compositions with jazzed-up spirituals as well as a rollicking version of Civil Rights anthem “We Shall Overcome”, Charles Mingus’ politically charged “Fables of Faubus”, and Curtis Mayfield’s black pride hit “We Are a Winner”.

To view the video, click the following link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UrSBoArCUJ0

Based on his extensive research into the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 60s, he’s crafted a highly personal work that captures the era’s charged energy and fierce sense of mission. Wielding his 15-piece jazz orchestra with confidence and precision, Shelby brilliantly showcases some of the Bay Area’s most accomplished and expressive musicians, including trumpeters Darren Johnston and Mike Olmos, reed experts Sheldon Brown, Howard Wiley and Gabe Eaton, pianist Adam Shulman and drummer Jeff Marrs. The video showcases the 15-piece ensemble at the height of their powers, brilliantly interpreting Shelby’s music and his message.

Just out on January 18, “Soul of the Movement” is already earning rave reviews:

DownBeat Editor’s Pick: “…his most ambitious project yet… a glorious tapestry that weaves together his vivid original compositions with his arrangements of classic spirituals.” – Ed Enright, DownBeat Magazine

“…he has created a most affecting and uplifting recording, performed with passion by the superb 15-piece Marcus Shelby Orchestra… Soul Of The Movement is an inspired, and inspiring, album.” – Bruce Lindsay, All About Jazz

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Ann Braithwaite) Press Releases Wed, 09 Feb 2011 18:00:00 -0600
Drummer/percussionist John Hollenbeck Releases http://jazzreview.com/jazz-news/press-releases/drummer/percussionist-john-hollenbeck-releases.html http://jazzreview.com/jazz-news/press-releases/drummer/percussionist-john-hollenbeck-releases.html "It's a real ensemble record, without many solos in the traditional jazz sense; the musicians play in tight, arranged sections, but also go to the other extreme, teasing out weird timbres and textures." -Ben Ratliff, The New York Times "[O]ne of the most brilliant musicians I've had the privilege of working with." - Meredith Monk "John Hollenbeck [has] achieved a maturity and musicality that defy categories and stretch our sensibilities to new heights.... His world vi

"It's a real ensemble record, without many solos in the traditional jazz sense; the musicians play in tight, arranged sections, but also go to the other extreme, teasing out weird timbres and textures." -Ben Ratliff, The New York Times

"[O]ne of the most brilliant musicians I've had the privilege of working with." - Meredith Monk

"John Hollenbeck [has] achieved a maturity and musicality that defy categories and stretch our sensibilities to new heights.... His world view, his imagination, his daring, and his skills, combined with a God-given gift, make him - to my ears - one of our most important composers." - Bob Brookmeyer

John Hollenbeck, who thinks of his 18-piece aggregation as an "ensemble of musicians" rather than a big band, takes the sound, energy, and force of a jazz big band and uses it in a way that doesn't sound dated or generic. The result is personal, non-genre specific music that redefines jazz big band music through novel instrumentation, sound, styles, rhythms, and material that ranges from funk, free, and straight-ahead jazz to minimalist music, African rhythms, and art song.

Hollenbeck, who studied with or was deeply influenced by innovative arrangers Bob Brookmeyer, Maria Schneider, and Jim McNeelyand, draws influences from Gyorgy Ligetí, Peter Garland, Brian Eno, and John Adams. He invents inclusive, "genreless" music that should appeal to a wide range of listeners, including fans of conventional jazz (not swing) big bands, improvised music, rhythmic/drum music, and ECM-like "new" classical music. Fascinating extended melodies, overlaid rhythmic textures, and out-of-the-ordinary timbres - including "bowed vibes," English horns, and the human voice - color and illuminate the music. The four octave voice of Theo Bleckmann is used extensively, both verbally, on breathtaking settings of "An Irish Blessing" (in the extended title track, "A Blessing," that opens the album) and "The Music of Life" (a poem by Hazrat Inayat Khan), and non-verbally, as an ensemble instrument that permeates the recording. From panting and grunting in "Weiji," to sci-fi outer space sounds whirring byin "Abstinence," to instilling pure and ethereal tone as it intermingles with bassist Kermit Driscoll's bass harmonics at the end of "The Music of Life," the never-before-heard timbres Bleckmann's voice creates with the ensemble are stunning.

Already known for his innovative drumming, Hollenbeck has a fan base of new music and progressive jazz aficionadosand a growing "cult" fan base from among progressive rock listeners, bolstered by extensive touring with his own Claudia Quintetand recordings with Quartet Lucyand as an in-demand sideman with Bob Brookmeyer's New Art Orchestra, Fred Hersch, the Jim McNeely Tentet, the Village Vanguard Orchestra, and Cuong Vu, among others. Featured on A Blessing are Ben Kono, flute, soprano and alto saxophone, bass clarinet; Chris Speed, clarinet; Tom Christensen, tenor saxophone, soprano saxophone, English horn; Dan Willis, tenor saxophone, soprano saxophone, English horn; Alan Won, baritone saxophone, bass clarinet; Jon Owens, Tony Kadleck, Dave Ballou, Laurie Frink, trumpet; Rob Hudson, Kurtis Pivert, Jacob Garchik, Alan Ferber, trombone; Gary Versace, piano Kermit Driscoll, bass; John Hollenbeck, drums, percussion; Matt Moran, mallets; Theo Bleckmann, voice; and JC Sanford, conductor.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Ann Braithwaite) Press Releases Sat, 29 Jan 2011 08:39:16 -0600