C.S. Reid - jazzreview.com - Your Jazz Music Connection - jazzreview.com - Your Jazz Music Connection http://jazzreview.com Tue, 23 May 2017 00:21:29 -0500 Joomla! - Open Source Content Management en-gb Dept. of Good and Evil featuring Rachel Z by Dept. of Good and Evil http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/contemporary-jazz-cd-reviews/dept.-of-good-and-evil-featuring-rachel-z-by-dept.-of-good-and-evil.html http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/contemporary-jazz-cd-reviews/dept.-of-good-and-evil-featuring-rachel-z-by-dept.-of-good-and-evil.html The Dept. of Good and Evil is the latest endeavor featuring pianist, Rachel Z; and also, serves as the moniker for the versatile trio. This astonishing CD reveals…

The Dept. of Good and Evil is the latest endeavor featuring pianist, Rachel Z; and also, serves as the moniker for the versatile trio. This astonishing CD reveals the diverse tastes of a musical ensemble that is crossing into an undiscovered segment of jazz.

The trio offers original compositions written by Rachel Z, collaborative fare with Bobbie Rae, and covers of Joe Henderson and Wayne Shorter tunes. This eclectic range of material is atypical, and entirely innovative on the part of the trio.

One of these innovative interpretations is the 80’s rockers, The Church’s (Milky Way"), which is a more cerebral and mature slant. In addition, Rachel Z transforms an array of pop classics to indie cuts starting from The Police ("King of Pain"), Joy Division ("Love Will Tear Us Apart"), Yeah Yeah Yeah ("Maps") and Death Cab For Cutie ("Soul Meets Body"). The aforementioned covers are unusual choices; and reflect the numerous influences that have shaped their distinct sound.

In particular, on "Soul Meets Body" the rhythmic swing is primal and creates a hypnotic lull to the ear. Also, guest trumpeter, Erik Naslund (featured on five tracks) skillfully manipulates said melodies by implementing riffs and harmonizations that are wholly singular interpretations.The virtuosity of Rachel Z’s playing, reigns supremely in the tonal qualities evoked on each track. On "King of Pain," the poignant intro features the coupling of the piano and trumpet, foretelling the moving mastery that is sure to follow. Lastly, Henderson’s ("Inner Urge") and Shorter’s ("ESP") blend adequately with the other compositions; and illustrate ample reinventions of these popular melodies.

Dept. of Good and Evil provides an extraordinary blend of compositions and cover materials that demonstrates the ever-changing future of jazz.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (C.S. Reid) Contemporary Jazz - CD Reviews Wed, 07 Mar 2007 18:00:00 -0600
Trio/Live by Stew Cutler http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/free-jazz-avante-garde-cd-reviews/trio/live-by-stew-cutler.html http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/free-jazz-avante-garde-cd-reviews/trio/live-by-stew-cutler.html The latest endeavor from guitarist, Stew Cutler, is entitled Trio/Live. The CD covers a wide spectrum of styles from blues, jazz, and even veers into the avant-ga…

The latest endeavor from guitarist, Stew Cutler, is entitled Trio/Live. The CD covers a wide spectrum of styles from blues, jazz, and even veers into the avant-garde.The diverse span of his compositions are an interesting and invigorating mix. Trio/Live (recorded live in November, 2004) features Cutler’s prodigious guitar skills.

On "Left Behind" and "Mourning Dance," the compositions are in a free and unrestrained format that allows Cutler to cut loose−pardon the pun. The sound created is unbridled and moves in an atypical progression, and it is difficult to discern the overall direction. The tune "Spaghetti Western" showcases the vibrant exchanges between Cutler and his fellow musicians: Gene Torres (bassist) and Garry Bruer (drummer). The phrasings played off one another, become a meaningful dialogue that is poignant to the ear; and the drum rhythm is very subtle, offering a soothing foundation for Cutler and Torres to demonstrate their talents. Lastly, on "Yippie-Tai-Yi-Yo," Cutler diverges to a country tune. The melody is endearing and the musicianship has a more laid back feel. The tune is infectious and conjures feelings of nostalgia, as one is swayed by the melody. The musical selections are unusual and at times, foreign to the ear.

The compositions veer from mainstream, easy-listening jazz genres, but for the more eclectic palate, Trio/Live will satiate the appetite.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (C.S. Reid) Free Jazz / Avante Garde - CD Reviews Mon, 07 Aug 2006 07:00:00 -0500
Goin To Town: Live At The Green Mill by Deep Blue Trio http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/jazz-dvd-/-video-cd-reviews/goin-to-town-live-at-the-green-mill-by-deep-blue-trio.html http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/jazz-dvd-/-video-cd-reviews/goin-to-town-live-at-the-green-mill-by-deep-blue-trio.html The latest effort presented by the Deep Blue Organ Trio, Going To Town (available on CD and DVD from Delmark Records) encompasses diverse styles that transverse t…

The latest effort presented by the Deep Blue Organ Trio, Going To Town (available on CD and DVD from Delmark Records) encompasses diverse styles that transverse the genre of blues. A myriad of influences that register throughout are: bebop, swing, and jazz; and what unfolds to the ear is a stirring cacophony of sound. The Chicago based trio are seasoned professionals, and have toured individually with such notables as Sonny Rollins and Charles Earland. The venue, Chicago's Green Mill Cocktail Lounge, was ideal for the live unveiling of the six selections.

Deep Blue is composed of Bobby Broom (electric guitar), Chris Foreman (Hammond B3), and Greg Rockingham (percussion). Their true craftsmanship comes together in a uniformity that reflects the years (playing together since 1992, cemented the group in 2000) spent understanding the nuances of when to play off each other. This sentiment is reiterated in Broom's own musings: Embracing the importance of our chemistry was vital to the group's spirit. With it, there's something magical operating, in addition to the sum of the parts. Each individual shines; and the effects produced, in particularly Foreman's utilization of glissandi (the sliding of the hand across the keys), create an inordinate sound to each song's rendering.

The aforementioned technique, glissandi, figures prominently in the covering of the Fields and Kern's, "The Way You Look Tonight." An effective use of improvisations on this thirteen-minute performance, morphs the melody, in a manner that offers more substance to the standard's original framework. Moreover, in the tune "Lou," composed by Rockingham, the guitar solos reign throughout, creating licks that mimic the human voice; and the chord changes are spare„Ÿ delivering a subtle touch. The standard 12-bar blues structure of "Lou," is only the skeleton of the tune, the trio veers out of the traditional harmonic voicings, which demonstrates the complexities of the "experience" that is occurring in real-time, erecting the much needed layers (epidermis).

Going To Town is a remarkable compilation of songs that offer original compositions, as well as reinventions of familiar staples. One will have the urge to return, and listen for re-enactments of this live event again.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (C.S. Reid) Jazz DVD / Video - CD Reviews Thu, 03 Aug 2006 07:00:00 -0500