Gary Peterson - jazzreview.com - Your Jazz Music Connection - jazzreview.com - Your Jazz Music Connection http://jazzreview.com Mon, 22 May 2017 16:32:46 -0500 Joomla! - Open Source Content Management en-gb Live: The Authorized Bootleg by Joey DeFrancesco http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/straight-ahead-classic-cd-reviews/live-the-authorized-bootleg-by-joey-defrancesco.html http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/straight-ahead-classic-cd-reviews/live-the-authorized-bootleg-by-joey-defrancesco.html This "official bootleg" was recorded live at Yoshi's in Oakland, CA, April 6-9, 2006, with special guest, George Coleman, on saxophone. First, George Coleman who takes r…

This "official bootleg" was recorded live at Yoshi's in Oakland, CA, April 6-9, 2006, with special guest, George Coleman, on saxophone. First, George Coleman who takes right on off on Cherokee and the rest of these cuts. I love saxophone players. Stan Getz and Joe Henderson are gone. My son gave his up for rock 'n' roll and the race for stardom in tinseltown. I don't even know if my favorite living sax player is still with us but he was Stan Getz' sex tech for over 15 years constantly repairing and re-repairing an old beat up sax Getz just loved. He once was the arranger for the Air Force Band and a member of Buddy Rich's group. Enter George Coleman; just in time. Thank you, George Coleman. Where can I get more George Coleman, which almost rhymes with George Foreman? Does he have multiple children all named George too? I do not know. But he was on DeFrancesco's last CD, Organic Vibes, as well and on two live Miles Davis dates - Four And More and My Funny Valentine.

Organist DeFrancesco had the tapes rolling for this concert and decided this was his next CD and properly so. My daughter, the jazz pianist, once got to sit in on organ with her jazz drummer husband and Will Blades at John Lee Hooker's Boom Boom Room. Later, Dr. Lonnie Liston Smith told her she should be an organ player. Maybe she should. Jimmy Smith is now in that celestial orchestra in the sky and Jerry Garcia went and died on an incredible organ player in his Jerry Garcia Band, Melvin Seals. Seals is trying to keep the band afloat without Garcia. I know I'd pay to see a Melvin Seals Band. Wouldn't you?

On this set you get a lot of tried and true standards and the soloing by DeFrancesco, Coleman and singer Debbie McNabb on "I'm In The Mood For Love" is top notch. I don't know that I was all that familiar with Lee Morgan's "Ceora." But now I am as it's here alongside Rodgers and Hart and Johnny Mandel. Tasty; this CD grabs you right away and holds on all the way through "Autumn Leaves." It's on Concord and a keeper! Surprise, surprise. Now if my daughter can get my grandson going on bass she'll have her own organ trio.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Gary Peterson) Straight-Ahead - CD Reviews Fri, 12 Jan 2007 00:00:00 -0600
Whats Up: The Very Tall Band by Oscar Peterson http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/straight-ahead-classic-cd-reviews/whats-up-the-very-tall-band-by-oscar-peterson.html http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/straight-ahead-classic-cd-reviews/whats-up-the-very-tall-band-by-oscar-peterson.html Three very tall men, in all the meanings of the word, and their excellent drummer, Karriem Riggins, swing out on Johnny Hodges, Lester Young, Fletcher Henderson and Dizz…

Three very tall men, in all the meanings of the word, and their excellent drummer, Karriem Riggins, swing out on Johnny Hodges, Lester Young, Fletcher Henderson and Dizzie Gillespie. It's recorded live at the Blue Note in NYC in 1998 and much more than an afterthought to the Trio's first release from the same concert: 1999's The Very Tall Band Live at the Blue Note.

My Canadian cousin (don't I wish) Oscar Peterson is all over this in the company of uber vibist, Milt Jackson, and the man who put the bass in bass, Ray Brown. Legend has it Ray Brown, with an assist from her onetime piano teacher, Jimmy Rowles, "discovered" Diana Krall. Someone had to. She's Canadian too, come to think of it.

I remember watching an East Bay vibist walk his vibes across Lakeshore Drive in Clear Lake during a Jazz Festival a few years ago. The vision was both traffic stopping and memorable. I also spent a day with him later scooping out possible jazz club sites in Lower Lake. That came to naught, but, when Milt Jackson solos, it seems to me, I can still see that guy walking his sunlit, glowing gold vibes across the street. It was like a soundless solo and a sight you don't forget.

"Salt Peanuts" is wonderful because anything of necessity by Gillespie - say his rendition of He Beeped When He Should Have Bopped in the film, The Spitball Story - is so. Did Milt Jackson, Ray Brown and Oscar Peterson have positions in Gillespie's dream cabinet proposed during his 1964 run for the Presidency. As in Duke Ellington as Secretary of State or Ray Charles as Librarian of Congress? I do not know as I was too ignorant and unable to vote at the time. But, how many albums have you heard that were graced by the presence of Peterson, Jackson and Brown? Make a list sometimes.

A friend of mine, who's just about to begin writing for Jazz Review as I just have, did much of his previous writing about Lou Reed and Alice Cooper. But he recently sent me an unpublished piece about his favorite bassist, Ray Brown. I hope someone publishes it. The Very Tall Band works in mysterious ways even though two of them are jamming with much of the Great Day In Harlem now. "Three great masters of the art playing for each other" to quote the original liner notes for 1999's The Very Tall Band. That was a three night gig so What's Up showcases them playing even more cuts for you. Clear the CD player, Mabel. The Very Tall Band is here for another residency yet again.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Gary Peterson) Straight-Ahead - CD Reviews Wed, 10 Jan 2007 18:00:00 -0600
Monday Off by Monday Off http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/jazz-vocals-cd-reviews/monday-off-by-monday-off.html http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/jazz-vocals-cd-reviews/monday-off-by-monday-off.html Monday Off: big band era vocals meet contemporary harmonies. The group's name comes from musical theater's traditional night off. They've played Carnegie Hall a…

Monday Off: big band era vocals meet contemporary harmonies. The group's name comes from musical theater's traditional night off. They've played Carnegie Hall and made their TV debut on ABC's World News Tonight with Bucky Pizzarelli - playing christmas tunes.

Monday Off makes me think of the Modernaires. One of them even looks like he could have been a Modernaire. They remind that vocal groups such as the Four Freshmen and The Kingston Trio (yes, The Kingston Trio) inspired the Beach Boys whose Brian Wilson, the Mozart of our times, composed "Pet Sounds" and "Smile."

"Smile" was some 30 years in the making. The Trio gave the very vocally oriented now Middle Aged Beached Men their original stage outfits of button down shirts. Bob Shane, memorable singer of Scotch And Soda, told me in an interview several years ago, that the Trio's first ever gig was opening for Thelonious Sphere Monk. In the first volume of his Chronicles, Bob Dylan wrote that he went to see Monk and told him he was a folksinger. Monk allowed that that was "a pretty cool thing to be," then went on playing the piano. Perhaps he'd heard Nina Simone or Odetta sing folk songs in the same clubs Dylan frequented. "It's all music," as Dylan once said.

Monday Off is definitely all music with vocal harmonies to die for. Such as their outstanding take on Lennon/McCartney's "Blackbird," the wry "Take A Trip On My Little Airship" and "Five O'Clock Whistle." "If I Only Had A Brain" would make even Dan Quayle break into dance as he walked out of a John Mellencamp concert to protest an anti-Bush song by his fellow Hoosier.

They're like Manahattan Transfer on Broadway with Bucky Pizzarelli. Lerner/Lowe's "Wouldn't That Be Loverly" describes them perfectly, sorta like late night around here when all the folks have gone to bed at 7 p.m. Put this on. Heat up some hot chocolate. Squeeze your main squeeze should you have one and listen up to Monday Off. Your ears will thank you. Probably even Brian Wilson's one ear that's still working after the Boys' daddy dearest hit him so hard when he was a kid, will thank you too. Taking a cue from Ludwig Van, I'll plead the fifth on that one.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Gary Peterson) Jazz Vocals - CD Reviews Wed, 10 Jan 2007 12:00:00 -0600
All The Things You Are by Patrizia -The Sultry Lady of Jazz http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/jazz-vocals-cd-reviews/all-the-things-you-are-by-patrizia-the-sultry-lady-of-jazz.html http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/jazz-vocals-cd-reviews/all-the-things-you-are-by-patrizia-the-sultry-lady-of-jazz.html OK. Aretha Franklin is the queen of soul; and Nina Simone is the high priestess of soul. So, Patrizia can be the sultry lady of jazz if she wants to be. Why not? She's g…

OK. Aretha Franklin is the queen of soul; and Nina Simone is the high priestess of soul. So, Patrizia can be the sultry lady of jazz if she wants to be. Why not? She's got this CD to prove it. Her hot band. A picture of herself with one Hugh Martin, co-author of "An Occasional Man." There are eight pages of liner notes. Hey, I Could Write A Book, but Patrizia already has. Good reading, too. The special thanks take up a whole page alone and I think we can assume a lot of blood, sweat and tears went into this production. So, do I like it? Frankly, I didn't at first; but after a few more listenings it's started to grow on me. This seems a constant pattern, at least, for me. If something doesn't capture me the first time, out it will be back to haunt me later like a jazz version of Marley's ghost - Dickens, not Bob. Maybe it's because I'm so in love with the singing of Nina Simone, or my latest passion - Julie London - or my longtime passion - for Keely Smith. So, whatever. Here goes:

After reviewing my first 10 CDs for jazz review I may have heard one too many versions of "Loverman," "Send In The Clowns," and "Willow Weep For Me." Maybe I don't feel sufficiently sultry today? To paraphrase tinseltown's greatest screewriter, Bill Shakespeare: "the fault Dear Brutus...is in ourselves." Or, in this case, me. It's not really Patrizia who seems out of kilter here. It's me. I should mention the lovely photo of Patrizia and her band which looks like a Southern California version of the Buena Vista Social Club. Irwin Jacobs looks so much like my 75-year-old jazz pianist friend, AJ, they might be doppelgangers? So, for a mini-tour of Patrizia:

She says "All The Things You Are" has "always been her good luck charm." The "12 bar phrase" in "Don't Be On The Outside" clicks her clock. "In The Shadow Of Your Smile" caught her while she was..."watching an old classic movie, where a woman was thinking about the love she had for her dead husband...her loss, longing, and remembrance of a perfect love. This beautiful song was playing in the background after the death of the lady's husband." Patrizia wears her heart on her sleeve. You may love this CD. I expect to someday when I least expect it.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Gary Peterson) Jazz Vocals - CD Reviews Mon, 10 Jul 2006 01:00:00 -0500
Live At The Blue Monk by Joel Fetterman Felder Levin Trio http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/free-jazz-avante-garde-cd-reviews/live-at-the-blue-monk-by-joel-fetterman-felder-levin-trio.html http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/free-jazz-avante-garde-cd-reviews/live-at-the-blue-monk-by-joel-fetterman-felder-levin-trio.html This is indeed "independently creative music" according to the spokesperson for Charles Lester Music in Walnut Creek, CA. It's also a quite beautiful, if you give it the…

This is indeed "independently creative music" according to the spokesperson for Charles Lester Music in Walnut Creek, CA. It's also a quite beautiful, if you give it the close listen it deserves, live concert by "three internationally recognized leading innovators in improvisational music," she continues. This is like visiting Albert Ayler while he's having a cutting contest with Cecil Taylor, Don Cherry and both Son and Ra. It's a challenge, but one well worth taking if you've got an open mind and are ready to take a little trip on the trio's rocket ship. You never know where you're going to land, but the trip is both challenging and never boring. I knew there was a reason Don Cherry made two albums with Lou Reed and Jerry Garcia made one with Ornette Coleman. Those guys and these guys on "Live At The Blue Monk," are "out there," as they say.

Set aside a good block of time 'cause you're looking at and listening to 73:32 minutes of on and at the site - music, here. Those who know Kenny G's last name or actually like what he does, probably should try something else. This all took place at the Blue Monk in Portland, OR, last year. And, before I forget, Futterman has performed at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, the Berlin Festival and the North Sea Festival in Denmark. He's appeared on over 40 recordings with the likes of Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Joseph Jarman and esteemed bassist, Richard Davis. Alvin Felder is a founder of the ACCM (Avancement of Creative Music) in Chicago and has over 25 recordings under his brushes including those with Roscoe Mitchell, Clifford Jordan and Son Ra. Ira Levin is active in Northern California's new music scene and has appeared with Ira Sullivan, Yancy Taylor and Olyemi Thomas.

And, of course, this is not three guys blowing solo in a void. It's three master musicians interacting with themselves and thereby finding out what's going to happen. The sudden appearance of Futterman's wooden flute is both startling and truly breath taking. Other tracks range from back to the futuristic piano drum duets to saxophone shoot outs at the Blue Monk. This is fun. It's a different record every time.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Gary Peterson) Free Jazz / Avante Garde - CD Reviews Sun, 09 Jul 2006 07:00:00 -0500
Capistrano Sessions by Craig Buhler http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/cool-jazz-cd-reviews/capistrano-sessions-by-craig-buhler.html http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/cool-jazz-cd-reviews/capistrano-sessions-by-craig-buhler.html This is not my usual cup of tea. I try to stay away from anything that skirts with the definitions of smooth jazz or new age. I think of both genres as music for people …

This is not my usual cup of tea. I try to stay away from anything that skirts with the definitions of smooth jazz or new age. I think of both genres as music for people with short attention spans. This CD is good for me. First of all, because Buhler is a veteran musician - a well respected clarinetist and saxophonist - who is also a long time member of the group, Honk. Honk has produced five records or CDs in its 30 year life and toured with the Beach Boys and opened concerts for Chicago, Jesse Colin Young and Jackson Browne. While Buhler has produced six additional jazz CDs and appeared on 25 others.

I, myself, have done none of this though I have, as Mike Royko once observed, written the equivalent of 14 books. So, I am humbled by Buhler's Capistrano Sessions and its humbling effect on my false preconceptions. I like it; I even enjoy it. Yes, these are more, I suppose, tone poems, as a lot of decomposing composers used to call them (see M. Python) than full score mind boggling improvisations upon improvisations.

Buhler has also authored two original music books, one featuring 54 jazz etudes - 54 more than I've ever written - and the other, an ear training method book. In his spare time, he is the solo tenor saxophonist with the 19 piece Star Dust Big Band, has presented jazz for youth concerts at over 100 schools and is the improv coach for three school bands. So, I'm all ears, Professor Buhler. Without people like you and my daughter's teachers: Professor Herbie Lewis formerly of New College; Berklee School of Music grad, Melissa Bledsoe; and her two earliest jazz influences, Richard Davis and Roscoe Mitchell, she's still be a classical concert pianist. Davis and Mitchell always played the benefits for the Children's Montessori School of Mt. Horeb, WI. The other Montessori School had Ben Sidran. Say, that's pretty good too. I even once got to watch Wynton Marsalis teach a high school class in Anchorage and learned why they call him, Professor.

So, thank you, Craig Buhler. I'm going to play your CD a lot more than I had (pre?) planned. Maybe I'll learn something. I know my daughter and all her young jazz musician friends did because of players and teachers like you.

Buhler also surrounds himself with class. Drummer, Paul Kreibich has played with Woody Herman, Ray Charles and Carmen McRae. Hey, I'm from Milwaukee and I once met Herbie Stewart (Thundering Herd), the man Stan Getz called his greatest influence other than the obvious one - Prez. Trumpeter, fugelhornist and vibist, Brian Atkinson, has worked with Lou Rawls, Natalie Cole and Big Bad Voodoo Daddy. Bassist Joel Hamilton is an LA studio musician who has performed with Phil Woods and many others. All eleven pieces here are originals as befits Buhler, it seems. My favorites are Lookear, because it's a play on words; Capistrano, because of the swallows who come back to it; and Harbor Cafe Blues. Who doesn't like Harbor Cafes, and the blues? I know I do. Listen to find out which ones are yours.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Gary Peterson) Cool Jazz - CD Reviews Sat, 08 Jul 2006 13:00:00 -0500
You Stepped Out Of A Dream by Kate Paradise http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/jazz-vocals-cd-reviews/you-stepped-out-of-a-dream-by-kate-paradise.html http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/jazz-vocals-cd-reviews/you-stepped-out-of-a-dream-by-kate-paradise.html "Mean To Me" is on my CD player and on my CD player. Then it's on my CD player again. Paradise went to the University of Miami School of Music. There's a live cut on her…

"Mean To Me" is on my CD player and on my CD player. Then it's on my CD player again. Paradise went to the University of Miami School of Music. There's a live cut on here, Peggy Lee and Johnny Mandel's "The Shining Sea," from her senior recital. I really like that because my daughter, the jazz pianist, went to New College and played a Mose Allison song at her senior recital. It's the only one my son didn't record because he ran out of tape.

Wes Montgomery's "West Coast Blues" will make you want to move west while "'Round Midnight" has the words to Monk's classic, by Charles "Cootie" Williams and Bernard Hanigan. On "You Stepped Out Of A Dream" and "Alone Together" Paradise scat sings like Ella Fitzgerald without the Memorex. Usual Diana Krall comparisons. Elvis Costello has such good taste and they have twins with interesting names. Good pedigrees too.

I particularly like John River's bass playing, but then, my grandson is being groomed to play the bass with his mother and his jazz drummer father. Every good family band needs a bass player. "Teach Me Tonight" may make you want to register for lessons. Joseph Davidian's piano playing is essential too.

Paradise grew up in New Hampshire and is relatively new to Burlington (Vermont), her bio says. How far's Burlington? She's 25 and has performed with Kurt Elling, Kevin Mahogany, Claudia Acuna and Eliane Elias. She's tremendous and so is her band. Just who is Diana Krall again? Is she from Burlington too?

Kate Paradise is a jazz singer and educator. So there may be more like her coming down the pike. She makes me miss Wes Montgomery. But good jazz always does that. "Thanks to all the highly skilled teachers and musicians in New Hampshire, Florida and Vermont," Paradise says in her liner notes. Long may they take solos.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Gary Peterson) Jazz Vocals - CD Reviews Thu, 06 Jul 2006 13:00:00 -0500
Five For Freddie: Bucky Pizzarellis Tribute To Freddie Green by Bucky Pizzarelli http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/straight-ahead-classic-cd-reviews/five-for-freddie-bucky-pizzarellis-tribute-to-freddie-green-by-bucky-pizzarelli.html http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/straight-ahead-classic-cd-reviews/five-for-freddie-bucky-pizzarellis-tribute-to-freddie-green-by-bucky-pizzarelli.html It's like this, see. Bucky Pizzarelli is Freddie Green; John Bunch channels Count Basie; Warren Vache mutes Sweets Edison; Jay Leonardt goes upright with Walter Page; an…

It's like this, see. Bucky Pizzarelli is Freddie Green; John Bunch channels Count Basie; Warren Vache mutes Sweets Edison; Jay Leonardt goes upright with Walter Page; and Mickey is on a ouija board with Jo Jones. Put them all together, close your eyes, tap your red shoes toes first, and they're the All American Rhythm Section and you're not in Kansas anymore. You're digging the rhythm guitarist, a rhythm guitarist other than Lou Reed, who's rock and roll, but these things do cross over.

Bucky Pizzarelli and dese other guys really swing - get it - you better get it 'cause I know guys with offers you can't refuse, see. Don't forget to pay Tony's garbage bill on the way out, ok?

But not before you hear big band leader, Quincy Jones' "For Lena and Lennie." His big band is often listed among the very best, like Basie's and Berrigan's, and all those other cats. Copasetic, dig? Bunny's buried in Fox Lake and you oughta visit his grave sometime. Erle Smith, who said "all that jazz" a lot and with real authority played clarinet for him was from Madison. He still dressed, at 85, just like those snazzy guys in the All American Rhythm Section used to.

Check out dis Freddie Green guy's "Up In The Blues," "Corner Pocket," "Bustin' Suds," and "High Tide." You do remember the password for the speakeasy, don't ya? Good. Listen up and turn the lights out on your way out. Guido, the hit man, don't like it if youse leave them on. So get on outta here. Don't pass go; don't collect $200. And be sure to tip Bruno on your way out. Bruno don't get his tip; he gets mean.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Gary Peterson) Straight-Ahead - CD Reviews Thu, 06 Jul 2006 07:00:00 -0500
Afraid of the Heights by Leonisa Ardizzone Quartet http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/jazz-vocals-cd-reviews/afraid-of-the-heights-by-leonisa-ardizzone-quartet.html http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/jazz-vocals-cd-reviews/afraid-of-the-heights-by-leonisa-ardizzone-quartet.html Leonisa Ardizzone is the Ted Weems of modern jazz. But she doesn't lie on a couch and whistle which everyone thought Weems did. She swings and sways but not like Sammy K…

Leonisa Ardizzone is the Ted Weems of modern jazz. But she doesn't lie on a couch and whistle which everyone thought Weems did. She swings and sways but not like Sammy Kaye. She swings on Parker, Mingus and Gillespie and Coots. She's not really "Afraid of the Heights" - in this case Washington Heights - but is in turn "silly, sad, intense and light-hearted, bold and sublime." Her quartet has been together ocho anos and this is their first CD.

All ten tunes are tops. What are you waiting for? Whet your whistle. You won't stand still long enough to use the couch. Scat singing is on "Anthropology" and "Autumn Leaves." Lyrics by Leonisa Ardizzone are on Mingus' "Goodbye Pork Pie Hat." Whistling on "Afraid of the Heights." She says there's lots of doggy doo at Washington Heights but you won't find any on this recording.

Jobim's "Triste" will steal your heart as does all Jobim, Gilberto, Getz, Byrd and all those cats. My friend, the Milwaukee composer, Sigmund Snopek III, once told me he actually learned to phonetically sing in Portuguese so he could perform bossa nova. He loved it so much. Probably still does. Ask him?

"Alone Together" is its usual sumptuous self as you already know if you've ever been alone together with a soul mate or two. "I Got Lucky" when I got this one. Now, how to figure out how to get it off the CD player long enough to hear the next one.

Leonisa Ardizzone: "You Go To My Head." I think she will go to yours, too. Exit, stage left, whistling.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Gary Peterson) Jazz Vocals - CD Reviews Thu, 06 Jul 2006 01:00:00 -0500
Grady Tate: From The Heart by Grady Tate http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/jazz-vocals-cd-reviews/grady-tate-from-the-heart-by-grady-tate.html http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/jazz-vocals-cd-reviews/grady-tate-from-the-heart-by-grady-tate.html Grady Tate is a well known jazz and blues drummer whose work has graced an endless list of recordings. Tate has a brand new bag here as a singer. He sings Governor Jimmy…

Grady Tate is a well known jazz and blues drummer whose work has graced an endless list of recordings. Tate has a brand new bag here as a singer. He sings Governor Jimmy Davis' "You Are My Sunshine" as an opener on this CD recorded live at the Blue Note in NYC. My favorite version of that tune is Mose Allison's dirge-like take. But, Grady Tate's version is also a new favorite.

When it comes to scat singing, Tate need play second fiddle to no one as he proves on "Everybody Loves My Baby" and others. You also get Tate's take on "All Blues," with lyrics, of course, as well as "Lush Life" and "It Might As Well Be Spring." My favorite on the latter is by Stan Getz, Gary Burton and Astrid Gilberto, but Tate can sing about Spring in any season. Especially as it just happened to be the other day, as is comnon, at least in California. "This is a love fest," is how Tate prefaces "Teach Me Tonight." The 74-year-old singer and erstwhile drummer would get a lot of students.

Glen Drews' trumpet on "Everybody Loves My Baby" made me close my eyes and recall Kermit Ruffins at Donna's in the French Quarter. Neither he nor his band stood close to the microphone; They didn't need to if they even needed a mike. "Little Black Samba" is both South American and an obvious play on words. "Where Do We Start" indeed with the multi-talented Mr. Tate. (It's always Mr. on the second reference even if this isn't the New York Times.)

Tate has style, however, and lots of it. Liner notes are by Bill Milkowski of Jazz Times and JazzIs Magazine. Bill wrote for my (and many others') old Milwaukee paper, The Bugle American and has made a well deserved name for himself. Never Blow Retreat, the Bugle's old motto, Bill.

The list of musicians Tate has backed is too long to include but among them are: Stan Getz, Count Basie, Clark Terry, Ella Fitzgerald, and Aretha Franklin. He reminds Bill Milkowski of Billy Eckstine and Lou Rawls. I want to add Jimmy Witherspoon, many of whose albums I heard when I was young and impressionable. I'll have to hit the net in search of Spoon's versions of these songs.

Meanwhile, "Little Black Samba" just made me roll up my rug. Bill Easley's flute would likely have the same effect I've observed in women dancing at blues clubs. Joe Louis Walker did that with his harp one night at Moe's Alley in Santa Cruz. My friend Sigmund Snopek III does it with his flute. He's personally played it in the ears of endless female audience members. Works for him and Joe Louis Walker who told me the only instrument he's ever not been able to master is the violin. I'll bet Grady Tate can play, or at least sing, that one too.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Gary Peterson) Jazz Vocals - CD Reviews Wed, 05 Jul 2006 19:00:00 -0500