Gloria Ellis - jazzreview.com - Your Jazz Music Connection - jazzreview.com - Your Jazz Music Connection http://jazzreview.com Wed, 24 May 2017 04:44:18 -0500 Joomla! - Open Source Content Management en-gb Shirley Horn Revered Jazz Vocalist and Pianist http://jazzreview.com/jazz-news/news-story/shirley-horn-revered-jazz-vocalist-and-pianist.html http://jazzreview.com/jazz-news/news-story/shirley-horn-revered-jazz-vocalist-and-pianist.html Shirley Horn
Not many vocalists could sing ballads in the slow sultry, romantic style as Shirley Horn, also, known as a very accomplished jazz pianist, Horn died Thursday evening (Oct. 20) at a nursing home in Maryland from a prolonged illness with diabetes, she was 71. Born in 1934, Horn grew up in her home state of Washington, DC where she began playing piano at age four. Later she studied music at Howard University School of Music; Horn also, received a music scholarship to attend Juilliard in N …

Not many vocalists could sing ballads in the slow sultry, romantic style as Shirley Horn, also, known as a very accomplished jazz pianist, Horn died Thursday evening (Oct. 20) at a nursing home in Maryland from a prolonged illness with diabetes, she was 71.

Born in 1934, Horn grew up in her home state of Washington, DC where she began playing piano at age four. Later she studied music at Howard University School of Music; Horn also, received a music scholarship to attend Juilliard in New York City however, for financial reasons could not attend.

Eventually, in 1954 Horn formed a trio and recorded her first album "Embers And Ashes." Miles Davis loved the album so much; he extended an invitation for Horn to open for him at the Village Vandguard in New York City. The engagements led to a recording contract with Mercury Records and a lifelong friendship with Miles Davis. Quincy Jones played a significant part in in Horn’s career by producing two of Horn’s albums; "Lords Of Love" and "Shirley Horn With Horns," while at Mercury Records. Horn also had a great opportunity to work with such notable musician as Frank Wess, Joe Newman, Kenny Burrell, Hank Jones, and, many others established jazz artists.

After an extended absence from touring to raise a family, Horn’s fame and fortune grew to new heights in the 1980’s and 1990’s when she released fourteen albums for the Verve label. Horn became one of the most notable and sought after artist gaining admirers at each and every performance. Through the years Horn has been nominated for eight Grammy Awards but, it wasn’t until 1998 that Horn won her first Grammy Award for best Jazz Vocals performance for her tribute to jazz legend Miles Davis, "I Remember Miles."

Horn received many honors and achievements in her lifetime which includes an Artistic Excellence Awards in 2003; Horn was also honored at the Kennedy Center in 2004 with a star-performance tribute and, named a 2005 National Endowment for the Arts, Jazz Master. She is survived by her husband, daughter, and, grandchildren.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Gloria Ellis) News Story Sat, 29 Jan 2011 20:15:29 -0600
Lou Rawls Dies at 72 http://jazzreview.com/jazz-news/news-story/lou-rawls-dies-at-72.html http://jazzreview.com/jazz-news/news-story/lou-rawls-dies-at-72.html The man with the deep, silky, and, distinctive voice, who gave so much pleasure to millions of people all over the world with his music, has succumbed to lung and brain cancer. Lou Rawls passed in Los Angeles, CA at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Friday morning January 6, 2006. Rawls was diagnosed with lung cancer in December 2004 and brain cancer in May 2005. Even though Rawls’ doctor felt he only had a short time to live, Rawls remained positive to the end. Rawls’ career sp …

The man with the deep, silky, and, distinctive voice, who gave so much pleasure to millions of people all over the world with his music, has succumbed to lung and brain cancer. Lou Rawls passed in Los Angeles, CA at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Friday morning January 6, 2006. Rawls was diagnosed with lung cancer in December 2004 and brain cancer in May 2005. Even though Rawls’ doctor felt he only had a short time to live, Rawls remained positive to the end.

Rawls’ career spanned some forty plus years, and garnered him many albums and awards.

Rawls humble beginning began in has native state of Chicago. He was raised by his grandmother, who brought Rawls up in the church, where he sang in the church choir.

He traveled with the choir and sang gospel through out the United States. He later served in the armed forces for two years. After his duty for his country he rejoined the Travelers gospel choir and continued touring.

One of Rawls opportunities came in 1962 when he signed with Capital Records and recorded his debut album, I‘d Rather Drink Muddy Water. From their Rawls’ career just propelled him into the legend he is today. Rawls free flowing style in music is loved by many, his versatility in gospel, R&B, blues, jazz, and pop has earned him thirteen Grammy nominations and three Grammy Awards. Rawls, first Grammy came in 1967 for best R&B vocal performance, with "Dead End Street." History repeats itself for Rawls in 1971 with another Grammy, for, "Natural Man, best R&B vocal performance." And "Unmistakably Lou" won Rawls his third Grammy for best R&B vocal performance at the1977 Grammy Awards.

However, "You’ll Never Find (Another Love Like Mine)", is Rawls biggest hit, penned by Philadelphians Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff. Over the years his music has continued to mesmerize his fans, with sold out performances all over the world as he interjected his own artistic and creative spin into his versatile style of music.

Let’s not forget that Lou Rawls contributed a very important part as spokes person for the charitable telethon, the "United Negro College Fund (UNCF)," which helped raise millions of dollars for scholarships and shed bright lights on many futures, hopes, and dreams of college bound students. He will truly be missed by many.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Gloria Ellis) News Story Sat, 29 Jan 2011 20:15:26 -0600
12th Annual Central Avenue Jazz Festival http://jazzreview.com/jazz-news/news-story/12th-annual-central-avenue-jazz-festival.html http://jazzreview.com/jazz-news/news-story/12th-annual-central-avenue-jazz-festival.html Central Avenue one of the historic platforms in jazz history where legendary jazz artists performed from the 1920’s thru the 1950’s in the mist of the jazz era. These Artists include Dexter Gordon, Billie Holiday, Clora Bryant, Buddy Collette, Lionel Hampton, Melba Liston Teddy Edwards, Art Tatum, and Hadda Brooks. In addition to Gerald Wilson, Cab Callaway, Count Bassie, Duke Ellington and, many more jazz greats that graced the stages of the numerous clubs and theatres along Central Avenue. …

Central Avenue one of the historic platforms in jazz history where legendary jazz artists performed from the 1920’s thru the 1950’s in the mist of the jazz era. These Artists include Dexter Gordon, Billie Holiday, Clora Bryant, Buddy Collette, Lionel Hampton, Melba Liston Teddy Edwards, Art Tatum, and Hadda Brooks. In addition to Gerald Wilson, Cab Callaway, Count Bassie, Duke Ellington and, many more jazz greats that graced the stages of the numerous clubs and theatres along Central Avenue. Club Alabam, located in the Dunbar Hotel where most of the black musicians called home while they were in town, was one of the pivotal center points along with the Last Word, Downbeat, and the Lincoln Theatre. There were also many other clubs that helped give Central Avenue the rich culture and flavor that still rings loud and clear in the hearts and minds of jazz lovers today.

For the past eleven years Central has celebrated with a festival that paid homage to the legendary jazz artist past and present. The 12th Annual Central Avenue Jazz Festival will be held Saturday July 28 and Sunday 29, 2007 at 11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Masters of ceremonies will be conducted by Michael Dolphin, Jose Rizo and James Janisse, just the right team to introduce the great music from the fantastic artist that will performed at this year’s festival.

Saturday July 28, 2007

Panel Discussion moderated by Clora Bryant

Paul Bryant Trio

Ernie Andrews

Phil Ranelin

Jazz on the Latin Side All Stars

Arthur Blythe Quintet

Sunday July 29, 2007

Jazz America

CJS Quintet

Henry Franklin feature Michael Sessions

Roy Gaines

Gilbert Castellanos Latin Trumpet Summit

Charles McPhearson

Sandra Booker’s Underground Jazz Movement

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Gloria Ellis) News Story Sat, 29 Jan 2011 20:14:41 -0600
Jazzfest in Full Swing http://jazzreview.com/concert-reviews/jazzfest-in-full-swing.html http://jazzreview.com/concert-reviews/jazzfest-in-full-swing.html The Big Easy was in full swing for its’ 37th Annual Jazz & Heritage Festival. The city of New Orleans once again came together after the aftermath two years ago of both Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita to showcase one of the largest tourist attraction in the United States. New Orleans is the original birth place of jazz with the greatest jazz sound in the world and home to some of the greatest jazz musicians that ever lived past and present. <P> Jazzfest got under

The Big Easy was in full swing for its’ 37th Annual Jazz & Heritage Festival. The city of New Orleans once again came together after the aftermath two years ago of both Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita to showcase one of the largest tourist attraction in the United States. New Orleans is the original birth place of jazz with the greatest jazz sound in the world and home to some of the greatest jazz musicians that ever lived past and present.

<P>

Jazzfest got under way with a great start and a fine line up. Headlining this year’s Jazzfest was Harry Connick Jr., Steely Dan, Jill Scott, John Legend, Norah Jones, Rod Stewart, and John Mayer on various stages throughout the festival. AT&T / WWOZ Jazz Tent, highlighted some of the most prestigious jazz artistes of New Orleans and abroad. James Carter an established saxophonist, arranger, writer and composer played his saxophone with plenty of enthusiasm, exciting his audience, and holding their interest while asking for Carter to give more and more. Over on the Congo Square Stage, Troy "Trombone Shorty" Andrews wowed his fans with more of a funk spin than traditional and modern jazz sound. Andrews, a very skilled trombonist and trumpeter, entertained the audience just like a funk/rock star- his devotees loved his creative style. While Andrews was entertaining the crowd on the Congo stage multi-instrumentalist, Lucky Peterson astounded the blues crowd as a triple threat - a guitarist, pianist, and organist.

<P>

Jazz lovers were treated to a great set from James Rivers, a multi-reed musician, first playing the saxophone then bagpipes and finally the flute. Mose Allison with quite a different style of entertainment gave the jazz tent audience an interesting set from the piano bench. While pianist Mose Allison was playing at the jazz tent, trumpeter Gregg Stafford and his Young Tuxedo Brass Band were delighting jazz lovers in the Economy Hall Tent when the second line paraded through the tent as some attendees joined in the march. Davell Crawford, pianist, embellished the Congo Square Louisiana Rebirth Stage with his excitable style of performance. Crawford grabs you right away and holds your attention with his energy, artistic abilities, and great vocals.

<P>

Meanwhile New Orleans native trumpeter Terence Blanchard gave an amazing set at the AT& / WWOZ Jazz Tent that gave his audience the perfect interpretation of contemporary jazz, and the Southern Comfort Blues Tent audience was busy embracing folk vocalist and guitarist Richie Havens. A legend in his own time and great saxophonist Pharoah Sanders who played in John Coltrane’s band graced the jazz tent with his presence. Sanders performed his beautiful style of modern jazz that thrilled his audience as he ended his set with a very energetic up beat selection, which had the jazz lovers on their feet interacting with every beat and sound of rhythm. Sanders and his quartet were loved so much they were brought back on stage for an encore. Sanders is truly a living legend. Whereas, vocalist Linda Hopkins, was busy at the economy tent with her own brand of jazz and blues. Hopkins who was born in Louisiana and now resides in Southern California, gave her audience one of the best jazz and blues set this festival has ever had to offer with her amazing range, vocals, and stage presence.

<P>

During the second week of jazz fest the rain arrived for about two hours. Some festival attendees found themselves knee deep in water. It seemed the pumps couldn’t work fast enough to drain the rain water from the festival grounds. However, after the two hour down pour the weather remained cool, but clear and dry. The weather held nicely for the remainder of the festival and everyone was enjoying the moment with great food, cold drinks, good conversation, and plenty of fantastic music in just about every genre. Over at the AT&T WWOZ Jazz Tent Ellis Marsalis was beating down on all eighty-eight’s with such grace as the audience loved his lively up temple set. ZZ Top’s band played on the Acura Stage offered blues and rock while Walter "Wolfman" Washington & the Roadmasters gave you blues on the Southern Comfort Blues Stage.

<P>

How befitting it was for vocalist John Boutte to sing Randy Newman’s Louisiana song, "Louisiana Their Trying to Wash Away" in the jazz tent as festival attendees were wading in two feet of rain water. Again as usual a crowd favorite and great jazz vocalist Leah Chase never fails to please her jazz fans with wonderful songs and a beautiful personality. Roy Hargrove gave an incredible set with his big band and special guest Roberta Gambarini, as he orchestrated and improvised his way into greatness the originative trumpeter is always welcome and beloved at the jazz tent. The final day of the jazz festival was met with great weather and plenty of good music of many genres. Jazz pianist Harry Connick, Jr. on the Acura Stage, R&B vocalist Joss Stone on the Gentilly Stage, and over at the blues tent performing was R&B vocalist Marva Wright and later blues vocalist, guitarist, and keyboardist Taj Mahal.

<P>

As the last day of the Jazz & Heritage Festival came to an end, two of New Orleans greats were to be honored at the AT&T / WWOZ Jazz Tent, clarinetist Alvin Batiste and drummer Bob French. Well, the time came and the tributes did take place, however, Alvin Batiste was not be present because he died in his sleep early that morning of an apparent heart attack. Batiste will be mourned and missed by many as well as celebrated by many more for who he was and his accomplishments. His students, Branford Marsalis, Harry Connick, Jr., and Bob French along with many others helped celebrate the memory of Alvin Batiste that day in the jazz tent.
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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Gloria Ellis) Concert Reviews Sat, 29 Jan 2011 09:39:37 -0600
Jazzfest in Full Swing http://jazzreview.com/concert-reviews/jazzfest-in-full-swing.html http://jazzreview.com/concert-reviews/jazzfest-in-full-swing.html The Big Easy was in full swing for its’ 37th Annual Jazz & Heritage Festival, the city of New Orleans once again came together after the aftermath two years ago of both Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita to showcase one of the largest tourist attraction in the united states. New Orleans is the original birth place of jazz with the greatest jazz sound in the world and home to some of the greatest jazz musicians that ever lived past and present. Jazz fest got under way

The Big Easy was in full swing for its’ 37th Annual Jazz & Heritage Festival, the city of New Orleans once again came together after the aftermath two years ago of both Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita to showcase one of the largest tourist attraction in the united states. New Orleans is the original birth place of jazz with the greatest jazz sound in the world and home to some of the greatest jazz musicians that ever lived past and present.

Jazz fest got under way with a great start and a fine line up Headlining this year’s Jazz fest was Harry Connick Jr., Steely Dan, Jill Scott, John Legend and Norah Jones, Rod Stewart, and John Mayer on various stages throughout the festival. AT&T / WWOZ Jazz Tent, highlighted some of the most prestigious jazz artistes of New Orleans and abroad. James Carter an established saxophonist, arranger, writer and composer in his own right played his saxophone with plenty of enthusiasm, exciting his audience, and holding their interest while asking for Carter to give more and more. Over on the Congo Square Stage Troy "Trombone Shorty" Andrews wowed his fans with more of a funk spin than traditional and modern jazz sound. Andrews, a very skilled trombonist and trumpeter, entertained the audience just like a funk/rock star- his devotees loved his creative style. While Andrews was entertaining the crowd on the Congo stage multi-instrumentalist, Lucky Peterson astounded the blues crowd as a triple threat as a guitarist, pianist, and organist.

Jazz lovers were treated to a great set from James Rivers as a multi-reed musician first playing saxophone then bagpipes and finally flute. Mose Allison with quite a different style of entertainment gave the jazz tent audience an interesting set from the piano bench. While pianist Mose Allison was playing at the jazz tent trumpeter Gregg Stafford and his Young Tuxedo Brass Band were delighting Jazz lovers in the Economy Hall Tent when the second line paraded through the tent as some attendees joined in the march. Also, as Allison and Stafford were doing their thing on stage, Davell Crawford, pianist embellished the Congo Square Louisiana Rebirth Stage with his excitable style of performance Crawford grabs you right away and holds your attention with his energy, artistic abilities, and great vocals.

Meanwhile New Orleans native trumpeter Terence Blanchard gave an amazing set at the AT& / WWOZ Jazz Tent that gave his audience the perfect interpretation of Contemporary jazz, and the Southern Comfort Blues Tent audience was busy embracing Folk vocalist and guitarist Richie Havens. A legend in his own time a great saxophonist Pharoah Sanders who played in John Coltrane’s band graced the jazz tent with his presents. Sanders performed his beautiful style of modern jazz that thrilled his audience as he ended his set with a very energetic up beat selection, which had the jazz lovers on their feet interacting with every beat and sound of rhythm. Sanders and his quartet were loved so much they were brought back on stage for an encore Sanders is truly a living legend. Whereas, Vocalist Linda Hopkins, was busy at the economy tent with her own brand of jazz and blues. Hopkins born in Louisiana now resides in Southern California gave her audience one of the best jazz and blues set this festival has ever had to offer with her amazing range, vocals and stage presence.

During the second week of jazz fest the rain arrived, for about two hours, some festival attendees found them-selves knee deep in water. Seems the pumps couldn’t work fast enough to drain the rain water from the festival grounds. However, after the two hour down pour the weather remained cool, but clear and dry. The weather held nicely for the remainder of the festival and everyone was enjoying the moment with great food, cold drinks, good conversation, and plenty of fantastic music in just about every genre. Over at the AT&T WWOZ Jazz Tent Ellis Marsalis was beating down on all eighty-eight’s with such grace as the audience loved his lively up temple set. ZZ Top’s band played on the Acura Stage offered blues and rock while Walter "Wolfman" Washington & the Roadmasters gave you blues on the Southern Comfort Blues Stage.

How befitting it was for vocalist John Boutte to sing Randy Newman’s’ Louisiana song, "Louisiana Their Trying to Wash Away" in the jazz tent as festival attendees were wading in two feet of rain water. Again as usual a crowd favorite and great jazz vocalist Leah Chase never fails to please her jazz fans with wonderful songs and a beautiful personality. Roy Hargrove gave an incredible set with his big band and special guest Roberta Gambarini, as he orchestrated and improvised his way into greatness the originative trumpeter is always welcome and beloved at the jazz tent. The final day of the jazz festival was met with great weather and plenty of good music of many genres. Jazz pianist Harry Connick, Jr. on the Acura Stage, R&B vocalist Joss Stone on the Gentilly Stage and over at the blues tent performing was R&B vocalist Marva Wright and later blues vocalist, guitarist, and keyboardist Taj Mahal.

As the last day of the Jazz& heritage Festival was coming to an end two of New Orleans greats were to be honored at the AT&T / WWOZ Jazz Tent, clarinetist Alvin Batiste and drummer Bob French. Well, the time came and the tributes did take place, but Alvin Batiste would not be present he died in his sleep early that morning of an apparent heart attack. Batiste will be mourned and missed by many as well as celebrated by many for who he was and his accomplishments. His Students, Branford Marsalis, Harry Connick, Jr., Bob French along with many others helped celebrate the memory of Alvin Batiste that day in the jazz tent.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Gloria Ellis) Concert Reviews Sat, 29 Jan 2011 09:39:35 -0600
New Orleans Jazzfest Lives On http://jazzreview.com/concert-reviews/new-orleans-jazzfest-lives-on.html http://jazzreview.com/concert-reviews/new-orleans-jazzfest-lives-on.html Jazzfest in The Big Easy took place in spite of the damage that Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita ravaged the state of Louisiana with last year. The city of New Orleans would not be denied of its beloved Jazz & Heritage Festival, which show cased New Orleans as one of the largest tourist attractions in the United States. New Orleans is the original birth place of jazz with the greatest jazz sound in the world and home to some of the greatest jazz musicians that ever lived past and pres

Jazzfest in The Big Easy took place in spite of the damage that Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita ravaged the state of Louisiana with last year. The city of New Orleans would not be denied of its beloved Jazz & Heritage Festival, which show cased New Orleans as one of the largest tourist attractions in the United States. New Orleans is the original birth place of jazz with the greatest jazz sound in the world and home to some of the greatest jazz musicians that ever lived past and present.

The Jazzfest got under way with a great start and a fine line up Keb’ Mo’, Bob Dylan, and Dr. John graced the Acura Stage one after another keeping the crowd on their feet and dancing in the aisles. BellSouth WWOZ Jazz Tent, highlighted pianist Jonathan Batiste as a rising star in the jazz genre. Batiste, at the young tender age of nineteen, played the piano with plenty of enthusiasm, exciting his audience, and holding their interest while asking for Batiste to give them more and more. Jazz lovers could hardly catch their breath when Charmaine Neville embellished the stage with her combustible style of performance. Neville grabs your attention right away and holds you hostage with her energy, artistic abilities, and great vocals.

Irvin Mayfield & the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra gave the closing performance on the jazz stage for the first night of the Jazzfest. The creative talent alone brings the audience to their feet under the direction of Irvin Mayfield an established trumpeter, arranger, writer and composer in his own right. Before the evening was over Mayfield himself, as well as his guest trumpeter, kermit Ruffins, trombonists, Tory Andrew and Steve Walker, would delight the audience with his great artistic trumpet playing. The first day of Jazzfest was a good day, great music from ten stages free from thunder storms and lighting.

As Jazzfest continued, the weather held nicely and everyone was enjoying the moment with great food, ice cold drinks, good conversation, and plenty of fantastic music in just about every genre. Dave Matthews band on the Acura Stage offered rock while Etta James and the Root Band gave you blues on the Southern Comfort Blues Stage. Two stages over, Hugh Masekela provided the massive crowd with meticulous trumpet playing. Herbie Hancock Quartet consisting of drummer Brian Blade, bassist Marcus Miller, and himself a dynamic pianist, fired up the jazz stage and had the crowd frozen in time. Following Hancock, was the creative and artistic trumpeter Terence Blanchard. Always the crowd favorite, Blanchard gives his all never a disappointment, but quite the opposite, pleasing his fans with great compositions and incredible improvisations.

Bruce Springsteen with the Seeger Sessions Band, Allen Toussaint with special guest Elvis Costello, and Sonny Landreth all performed on the Acura stage in front of one of the largest crowd at Jazzfest. The Meters gave a rousing jam session on the Southern Comfort Blues Stage, and one stage over was gospel singer Yolanda Adams, who sang divinely for the crowd at the Congo Square Louisiana Rebirth Stage. Christian Scott, one of the hottest and charismatic trumpet players in New Orleans, pleased the over flowing jazz crowd with straight ahead jazz and a mixture of jazz and R&B. The jazz tent continued to offer the audience great music, as jazz vocalist Leah Chase performed on stage with guest saxophonist Wess " Warm Daddy" Anderson. Chase offered toe tapping arrangements a well as soft heartfelt ballads, complimented with the warm deep sound of Anderson’s saxophone.

Troy "Trombone Shorty" Andrews with special guest trombonist Steve Turre, gave a slightly different approach to jazz, more of a rock spin than straight ahead jazz. Andrews, a very skilled trombonist and trumpeter, entertained the crowd just like a rock star running and leaping around the stage throwing up his arms with trumpet or trombone in hand on occasions. Some of the fans seem to love it while others wonder if Andrews was crossing over to a new genre. Only time will tell, "but let’s hope not, it would be a shame to lose such a creative and innovative young jazz musician."

The second week of Jazzfest resumed to offer more great music and entertainment, the fans continued to flood the gates with expectations of having a good time in spite of the damage to New Orleans by Hurricane Katrina and Rita. Sunshine for everyone as the weather fair’s well. Red hot was the Jazz Tent as the Books Family Project got under way. it was truly a family affair. brother Detroit on guitar, brother Mark on bass, and sister Juanita Brooks singing vocals. Brooks sang so beautifully and passionately, catching the pure essence of the moment with precise timing and phrasing. Brooks’ performance was so pleasing to the audience and over much too quickly! The Jazz Tent flowed on with a set from trumpeter Jeremy davenport thrilling the audience with his skillful playing. Stephanie Jordan with special guest pianist Doug Carn, also joining Jordan on stage was brother Kent, Flutist and brother Marlon, saxophonist. The crowd loved Jordan’s performance, she was elegant as well as sophisticated; she sang so wonderfully as she flowed across the stage gracefully and took a moment to reminisce about the late great jazz vocalist Shirley Horn. Jordan has established herself in the jazz world as a prominent young jazz vocalist. I’m sure you will see a lot more of her in the near future.

Over on the Southern Comfort Blues Stage the ladies were making themselves known to the many fans that crowded around the stage to hear some great sounding blues pianist Marcia Ball, vocalist Marva Wright & the BMW’s, and the queen of the blues, Koko Taylor & Her Blues Machine.

As the Jazzfest comes to a close and the sun begins to set you can’t forget the fantastic music that makes New Orleans the great city that it is. In the Jazz Tent violinist Michael Ward’s set was so energetic that it brought the crowd to their feet several times during his performance. Vocalist John Boutte’ shares how deeply rooted he is in New Orleans as he sings the "Louisiana song", (penned by Randy Newman). Pianist Ellis Marsalis with special guest Saxophonist Lew Tabackin, shared the jazz stage bringing the sound of modern jazz with plenty of wisdom and experience to compliment their artistic flow.

The Acura Stage shined bright with Irma Thomas even through there was a twenty minute rain delay. However, this did not really seem to brother anyone. After it was over Thomas began singing one of her old tunes "It’s Rainin," quite fitting for the moment. Thomas went on to give a great performance as always. Paul Simon continued to captivate the large crowd while they waited for the closing act of the legendary Fats Domino. However, that was not to be. Domino 78 years old wasn’t feeling well. Domino made a brief appearance and apologized to his fans for the last minute cancellation. Moments later the decision was make for Lionel Richie to move from the Southern Comfort Blues Stage to fill in for the ill Fats Domino, and Sam Moore’s set on the Blues Stage would be extended to fill in for Richie. That just goes to show you, when great minds work together everything turns out alright!

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Gloria Ellis) Concert Reviews Sat, 29 Jan 2011 09:38:11 -0600
India Arie at UCLA --- Royce Hall http://jazzreview.com/concert-reviews/india-arie-at-ucla-royce-hall.html http://jazzreview.com/concert-reviews/india-arie-at-ucla-royce-hall.html India Aries’ performance at UCLA’s Royce Hall was simply amazing Thursday evening. Arie sung beautifully in her "Brown Skin," a top ten song from her first platinum CD Acoustic Soul. Arie vast musical styles can sometimes range from Neo Soul, R&B with a pop flavor and drippings of smooth jazz vibes. Arie performed an array of songs from her first CD as well as her latest platinum CD Voyage To India, which she won two Grammy Awards. "Vagina Monologue," a song Arie wrote for an u
India Aries’ performance at UCLA’s Royce Hall was simply amazing Thursday evening. Arie sung beautifully in her "Brown Skin," a top ten song from her first platinum CD Acoustic Soul. Arie vast musical styles can sometimes range from Neo Soul, R&B with a pop flavor and drippings of smooth jazz vibes.

Arie performed an array of songs from her first CD as well as her latest platinum CD Voyage To India, which she won two Grammy Awards. "Vagina Monologue," a song Arie wrote for an upcoming CD is an up beat tune which, Arie gives a very vivid and obvious meaning and message behind her lyrics. Arie took a moment in time to reflect on her music and admits that’s the way God works through her from life experiences-no wonder her songs are so, real-you felt as if you have lived them yourself. Arie songs are deep with raw emotion that often tells a story that someone somewhere can relate to.

Arie was very relaxed and mellow; she seemed to have a great connection with her audience as she revealed some very comical anecdotes regarding her first tour as the opening act for Sade. Also, an interesting account of her french bulldog which she named Sade. Throughout her performance Arie continued to delight and entertain her audience with various body movements and gyrations as she danced and twirled around the stage to show off her outfit. She then removed a portion of clothing to reveal a back-less top as the audience appreciated the flirtatious energy and interaction that Arie displayed.

Arie a native of Denver, Colorado and raised in Atlanta, Georgia from the age thirteen she began playing the guitar after graduating high school and somewhere along the way she picked up the flute and plays quite well-for a novice. As Arie reputation grew in Georgia she retained a loyal following and soon cut a CD of a collection of her first songs. However, she soon signed with Motown after she was given the assurance of artistic control. Is there any wonder why India Arie is one of the true originative singer/songwriter of the 21st century? There is no doubt that Arie is an artist with great creative qualities that truly defines her most inter-soul, with a hypnotic stage presence that draws her audience in and holds their attention throughout her performance as she shares her heart felt lyrics in song.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Gloria Ellis) Concert Reviews Sat, 29 Jan 2011 09:37:01 -0600
Old Pasadena Summer Fest http://jazzreview.com/concert-reviews/old-pasadena-summer-fest.html http://jazzreview.com/concert-reviews/old-pasadena-summer-fest.html After fifteen years the Old Pasadena Summer Fest moves to Brookside Park, Brookside is much larger, roomier and more accessible. The summer fest is one of the largest free jazz events in Southern California, attracting visitors in the thousands. The Playboy Jazz Fest offered plenty of live music-with various styles of jazz from traditional / contemporary smooth to Latin and Afro-Cuban-R&B and traditional blues as well. Percussionist Poncho Sanchez, blues guitarist Zac Harmon, smooth jazz
After fifteen years the Old Pasadena Summer Fest moves to Brookside Park, Brookside is much larger, roomier and more accessible. The summer fest is one of the largest free jazz events in Southern California, attracting visitors in the thousands. The Playboy Jazz Fest offered plenty of live music-with various styles of jazz from traditional / contemporary smooth to Latin and Afro-Cuban-R&B and traditional blues as well. Percussionist Poncho Sanchez, blues guitarist Zac Harmon, smooth jazz guitarist Paul Jackson Jr., flutist Hubert Laws and many more artists were scheduled to appear. Live performances began promptly at 11:00 a.m. for all three days of Memorial Day weekend from May 29 thru May 31, 2004.

The fun filled weekend provided over 20 hour of complimentary jazz, R&B and blues for everyone in attendance. Headliner for Saturday, day one was none other than flutist Hubert Laws, who wowed the audiences with his smooth style of play. Laws is versed in many facets of music from jazz, R&B too pop. Performing as well will be Cuban American Karina Nuvo in addition to her Cuban roots Nuvo has a very strong and soulful voice, self-described as Nuvo Soul. Tres-Dos a sextet Latin jazz Ensemble, highlighted with traditional Latin Vocals. Thomas Tedesco, Blue Vision featuring Greg Weins and the South Pasadena High School Jazz Band performed on Saturday, keeping the jazz fans wanting more.

Nothing short of electrifying is one way of summing up Sunday’s live performances of the spectacular diverse music styles. The notable jazz guitarist Paul Jackson Jr. delivered some of the most thrilling and exciting jazz and R&B of the day. Jackson kept the audience literally on their toes, dancing in the aisles standing on their seats and desperately trying to see all the action on stage. With all of the energy that Jackson and his band displayed he gracefully agreed to an encore to appease his adoring fans. Sunday’s line-up also featured the Henry Mora Orchestra. Mora’s big band sound articulated blends of salsa and R&B that mesmerized the throng of music lovers to rise and accentuate their bodies to the rhythm of the beat. There was plenty of vocal power to go around with vocalist Juliana Munoz, Noelia Hernandez, Bruni Mercado and Martin Xatruch they sung beautifully and harmonized well together to compliment Mora’s big band sound. Acoustically speaking, Malt is a jazz quartet composed of saxophone, bass, piano and drums with a wonderful blend for acoustic jazz with a taste of blues. The Sounds of New Orleans kept the flow of the moment in motion with their creative straightforward approach from jazz to R&B and Cajun.

Surely, with all the great performances and entertainment that has taken place over this warm holiday weekend, Monday’s range of artists provided summer fest with the ultimate climax. When speaking of Poncho Sanchez be careful, you do not leave out the word mastery. True to form as always Poncho delivered with astonishing creativity and artistic command from Latin/salsa to R&B and soul with support from his talented band. One would think that as the evening grew later and later the crowd would dwindle, but not so. One would also think that the Los Angeles, Laker’s play off game against the Minnesota Timberwolves would be a great reason for the crowd to diminish. However, it was not and the crowd grew larger, after all a master is at work giving the people what they wanted and what they wanted was great music at its very best. Furthermore, there was no visible indication that the frenzy would end which Sanchez and his band had started. People were everywhere and dancing on every available blade of grass from the front of the stage to the far corners of the rear. Sanchez came to do a job and he did it well.

Smooth jazz guitarist Paul Brown entertained the audience with his mellow style of contemporary jazz. Now out front and up close and personal with his jazz fans he delivered some great sounds from his debt CD Up Front. Also joining Brown on stage was smooth jazz artist and great saxophonist Michael Lington who has performed along side brown many times before, fused their style of play well together on stage. Other artists of the day were Dale Fielder Group/Force, jazz vocalist Cathy Segal and Mississippi Blues man Zac Harmon. With his big blues sound from Mississippi Harmon can go toe to toe with some of the best blues men in the business. Please don’t be shy, go ahead and mention Harmon’s name in the same sentence with Bobby "Blue" Bland, Albert King and Bobby Rush-just to name a few.

Old Pasadena Summer Fest had great attractions for every one of all ages and gender. The Family Fun Fest provided games, dancers, singing and interesting amusements to keep the kids entertained. A Taste of Summer presented a number of restaurants, luncheonettes and cafes with a variety of tasty foods and drinks-including soda, juice, beer and wine. The Summer Art Fest displays arts and crafts from more than 100 artists. The exhibition consists of photography, fine art, jewelry, blown glass, pottery, sculptures and much more. The Sports Zone added two new events this year-also, continuing to offer an array of interactive activities and a chance to meet professional athletes for autographs and photo opportunities.

Old Pasadena Summer Fest was a great three-day weekend with plenty of great musical performances, great entertainment, food and attractions for every one. If you missed this year’s summer fest plan to attend next years Memorial Day weekend-you will not be disappointed. However, there is more jazz at the 26th Anniversary Playboy Jazz Festival venue: the Hollywood Bowl Saturday June 19 and Sunday 20, 2004-plan to attend and pre order your tickets, via the Hollywood Bowl’s box-office and all Ticketmaster outlets.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Gloria Ellis) Concert Reviews Sat, 29 Jan 2011 09:37:00 -0600
The Wayne Shorter Quartet http://jazzreview.com/concert-reviews/the-wayne-shorter-quartet.html http://jazzreview.com/concert-reviews/the-wayne-shorter-quartet.html Once again tenor/soprano saxophonist Wayne shorter proves why he is the recipient of eight Grammy Awards and thirteen Grammy nominations. Shorter is joined by his quartet, drummer Brian Blade, pianist Danilo Perez and bassist John Patitucci also featuring the USC Thornton Jazz Orchestra. The evening was set at the University Of Southern California in the Bovard Auditorium as the jazz fans awaited the start of the show. Thelonious Monk Institute @ USC Ensemble began the evening with great con
Once again tenor/soprano saxophonist Wayne shorter proves why he is the recipient of eight Grammy Awards and thirteen Grammy nominations. Shorter is joined by his quartet, drummer Brian Blade, pianist Danilo Perez and bassist John Patitucci also featuring the USC Thornton Jazz Orchestra. The evening was set at the University Of Southern California in the Bovard Auditorium as the jazz fans awaited the start of the show.

Thelonious Monk Institute @ USC Ensemble began the evening with great contemporary jazz from drummer James Alsanders, bassist Alan Hampton, pianist Arpad Olah, saxophonist Gilad Ronen, vibraphonist James Westfall, trumpeter Dontae Winslow and special guest trumpeter Terence Blanchard. The six students are part of a two-year scholarship jazz education program. All six of the young musicians were selected by some of the most affluent veterans in jazz today. Institute Chairman Herbie Hancock, bassist Ron Carter and Artistic Director Terence Blanchard. This talented group of young men have studied and performed with many jazz greats such as trumpeter Clark Terry, bassist Charlie Haden, pianist Kenny Barron and drummer Lewis Nash. In Addition, they have performed far and wide with pianist Herbie Hancock and saxophonist Wayne Shorter.

However, the night clearly belonged to Wayne Shorter and his quartet as they graced the Bovard Auditorium with their artistic blends of contemporary jazz. Shorter began with a soft blend of complex improvisations that quickly impressed the audience into a thunderous applause of approval. Danilo Perez piano skills joined the creativity of bassist John Patitucci as he stroked and plucked the strings of his bass with authority. Drummer Brian Blade also, in tune interjected with a high level of energy as he too fused perfectly in sink with the quartet. As Shorter continued to work his magic with intricate phrasing as he would bend and stretching notes to shape them into his own unique styles and sounds of jazz.

Later in the evening Shorter and his quartet were joined on stage by the USC Thornton Jazz Orchestra which performed beautifully. They were amazing from beginning to end, inventing a larger sound of contemporary jazz with the masterful and skillful influences of Wayne Shorter and his quartet.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Gloria Ellis) Concert Reviews Sat, 29 Jan 2011 09:36:59 -0600
Rivers' Trio http://jazzreview.com/concert-reviews/rivers-trio.html http://jazzreview.com/concert-reviews/rivers-trio.html You’re as young as you feel; just ask eighty-year-old Sam Rivers- truly one of the few icons of contemporary jazz still performing like nobody’s business. The Multi-instrumentalist jazz pianist, tenor/soprano saxophonist and flutist came to play. Energetic, lively and witty as Rivers performed wonderfully at the Jazz Bakery with great support from the others in the trio, bassist and bass clarinetist Doug Mathews and drummer, tenor saxophonist and pianist Anthony Cole. A six days engagement w
You’re as young as you feel; just ask eighty-year-old Sam Rivers- truly one of the few icons of contemporary jazz still performing like nobody’s business. The Multi-instrumentalist jazz pianist, tenor/soprano saxophonist and flutist came to play. Energetic, lively and witty as Rivers performed wonderfully at the Jazz Bakery with great support from the others in the trio, bassist and bass clarinetist Doug Mathews and drummer, tenor saxophonist and pianist Anthony Cole.

A six days engagement with two shows each evening, Rivers gave his audience just what they expected, a very exciting and artistic performance filled with creativity and spontaneity. As Cole began the set with a skillfully sole selection on piano, Rivers performed a fiery solo of his own on tenor saxophone as well; but, not before Mathews fulfilled subtly alone on bass.

Rivers, a great musician who has performed with such legends in the music world as Billie Holiday, Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespie, Charles Mingus and Mc Coy Tyner. In addition, Rivers put to work his skills as a music director for greats, such as B.B. King, T-Bone Walker and Wilson Pickett.

As the evening wore on and the jazz set continued Rivers’ trio forged on with Rivers performing on flute and soprano saxophone, as Cole seized the moment to shine with a high energy exhibition on drums and Mathews with an equally impressive spotlight on electric bass. However, for me the highlight of the evening came as Rivers performed a very touching piano solo. Also, when the trio engaged in an all wind instrumental both Rivers and Cole executed an artful display on tenor saxophone and Mathews on bass clarinet. The audience loved the well-rounded interfusions of rich rhythmic melodies, resonating from all that brass.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Gloria Ellis) Concert Reviews Sat, 29 Jan 2011 09:36:50 -0600