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FEATURED INTERVIEWS

  • Born in Dallas, Texas and now happily domiciled in Los Angeles, bass player Edwin Livingston could be described as being on the crest of a wave.  His CD 'Transitions' was released in late 2010 and when recently I caught up…
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  • Kem Owens
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    Adekemi Owens, known professionally and affectionately to music fans as "Kem," has come a long way from Nashville, Tennessee to his current hometown of Detroit, Michigan. So, one figures that is why this musical genius has written and performed songs…
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  •  New Orleans trumpeter Nicholas Payton has never conformed to anyone or anything. Reading his Facebook posts and Twitter “tweets”, you sort of get an idea about how un-traditional he is. He speaks his mind and, should someone attempt to challenge…
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  • Law school creates more than a few challenges. There are hours upon hours of studying, grueling hours interning at law firms, and financial bills that need to find a way to get paid. For many law students the adversity is…
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MORE INTERVIEWS
Yasir Agha

Yasir Agha

Stephane Grappelli (originally surname was spelled with a 'Y') would have earned himself a place in Jazz History books if only for his important role in the Quintette of the Hot Club of France, featuring the dazzling virtuosity of Django Reindhart. Grappelli's violin was the perfect foil to Reindhart's guitar in this piano-less group.

Fired by Reindhart's tremendous rhythmic powers, Grappelli's contributions to recordings by the Quintette like Lime House Blues, China Boy and It Don't Me …
29.01.2011

Ruby Braff

Published in Artist Biographies
A marvelously eloquent, always mellifluous player, Reuben 'Ruby' Braff (born Boston, Mass., 1927) is something of throwback to jazz of pre - World War II except that where Braff is concerned his music sounds fresh and despite strong influences is Armstrong, Berigan, Hackett, James, he does not slavishly copy any of the great trumpeters / cornettists of the past. A self - taught musician, Braff has tended to concentrate almost exclusively on the warmer sound of the cornet (like, for example, Nat …
29.01.2011

King Oliver

Published in Artist Biographies
Cornet-player Joe "King" Oliver was born in 1885, joining Kid Ory's Brownskin Babies in about 1914 or 1915, and developing great expressive skills in the use of mutes.

Oliver, like many New Orleans musicians, left for Chicago after the closure of Storyville in 1918, forming his own band, King Oliver's Creole Jazz Band. Clarinetist Johnny Dodds eventually replaced Jimmie Noone, Lil Hardin took over piano from Lottie Taylor and Baby Dodds on drums replaced Minor Hall. In 1922, Oliver furt …
29.01.2011

Keith Jarrett

Published in Artist Biographies
The celebrated pianist Keith Jarrett first established his reputation in the popular Charles Lloyd group (Dream Weaver) where he proved himself to be a dazzlingly gifted player. A period with Miles Davis in the early '70s (Live Evil and At Fillmore) did not lead- as with pianists Chick Corea, Joe Zawinul and Herbie Hancock- to the subsequent formation of a jazz-rock outfit. Jarrett's career has been remarkably diverse.

Born Allentown, Pennsylvania, on May 8, 1945, Jarrett learned piano …
29.01.2011

John McLaughlin

Published in Artist Biographies
With his revolutionary Mahavishnu Orchestra, John McLaughlin became one of the most influential and individual fusion guitarists of the 1970s. His awesome, soaring, seemingly ever-ascending guitar lines- exploding in increasing mind-bending time signatures- tests the limits of human endurance for both player and listener.

Born in Yorkshire England, on January 4, 1942, McLaughlin was encouraged to learn piano from age 9 by his mother, an amateur violinist. All his brothers were musical a …
29.01.2011

Joe Pass

Published in Artist Biographies
Guitarist Joe Pass has been on the scene since the 1940s, achieving widespread recognition in the '70s due to shrewd management by Norman Granz.

A veteran of countless sessions with a wide selection of musicians-Chet Baker, Bud Shank, Gerald Wilson, Les McCann, Earl Bostic and Duke Ellington - Pass is a complete professional. Since singing to Pablo, he made triumphant appearances at the Montreux Festival (Joe Pass at Montreux) and JATP tours with Oscar Peterson, Zoot Sims etc. A sensiti …
29.01.2011

Jan Garbarek

Published in Artist Biographies
The distinguished Norwegian tenor saxophonist Jan Garbarek has been describes by George Russell as 'just about the most uniquely talented jazz musician Europe has produced since Django Reinhardt'. Garbarek is undoubtedly one of the most original individualists on saxophone to have emerged since the '70s.

Born in Mysen, Norway, 1947, Garbarek taught himself to play saxophone at age 14, inspired by hearing John Coltrane's Countdown on the radio. A year later, he was fronting the leading q …
29.01.2011

Ed Blackwell

Published in Artist Biographies
One of the greatest pioneers of free drumming in company with Sonny Murray and Milford Graves. Ed Blackwell's main body of work remains within the group context Ornette Coleman's Quartet and Don Cherry's units. Born in New Orleans, his drum concept fitted perfectly the needs of the new collective music-indeed, traditional New Orleans march rhythms combined with an African and Afro-Cuban influence in his work. A master craftsman, his preoccupation with shifting metres and sonics made him the idea …
Julian Cannonball Adderley was born in 1928 in Florida, moving to New York and emphatically into the big league in 1955. Basically a Charlie Parker disciple, the altoist had plenty of bite and a rhythmic directness that became more pronounced in his later work. The meeting with Miles Davis Somethin' Else proved something of a comeuppance, for the trumpeter was playing with such concision that Cannonball sounded positively garrulous. His work in the Miles Davis Group from 1957 Milestones, Kind of …
29.01.2011

Buddy Rich

Published in Artist Biographies
Born in New York, 1917, drummer Buddy Rich began in vaudeville at the age of 18 months, earning the nickname 'Baby Traps' by the time he was seven.

He worked with the bands of Bunny Berigan, Artie Shaw and Tommy Dorsey, developing into one of the best big-band drummers of the swing period. In 1946, he formed his own big band with financial help from Frank Sinatra with whom the belligerent drummer had had stormy relations since their Dorsey days.

With the decline of big bands, R …
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