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Jazz Diplomacy: Promoting America in the Cold War Era by Lisa E. Davenport

Jazz Diplomacy: Promoting America in the Cold War Era is a remarkable look at the enduring power of jazz as a communication tool between different countries. American jazz makes friends wherever it is allowed to go.

The introduction, chapters, notes, bibliography, and index make for enjoyable reading. There are six well-crafted chapters in the book, and each title is self-explanatory: Chapter 1, Battling the Reds; Chapter 2, Jazz Diplomacy at Home and Abroad, 1954-1957; Chapter 3, Jazz Means Freedom, 1957-1960; Chapter 4, The Paradox of jazz Diplomacy, 1961-1966;Chapter 5, Jazz Behind the Iron Curtain, 1961-1966; and, Chapter 6, Bedlam from the Decadent West, 1967-1968. An insightful conclusion follows the chapters.

As a reference work, the writing and research is superb. It is well worth the readers time and will make for a fine reference book for years to come. Some of the entries covered in the book include Louis Armstrong Josephine Baker Count Basie Art Blakey Dave Brubeck Nicholas Bulganin China Miles Davis Karel Duda Bill Eckstein Duke Ellington George Gershwin Benny Goodman Sol Harok Iron Curtain jazz styles Quincy Jones John F. Kennedy Nikita Khrushchev public diplomacy race relations Yuri Saulskii George Shearing Russia among many others.

You will find the notes section fascinating reading and the insights impressive. If you are curious about the situation of American Jazz during the Cold War years this book will answer your questions and offer explanations of the events and the people making the events and the news. An enjoyable reading experience this book is not to be missed!

Additional Info

  • Book Title: Jazz Diplomacy: Promoting America in the Cold War Era
  • Author: Lisa E. Davenport
  • Publisher: University Press of Mississippi
  • Year Published: 2009
  • Book Type:: Non-Fiction
  • ISBN: 9781604732689
  • Rating: Four Stars
  • Number of Pages: 219
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