Richard C. Anderson

Richard C. Anderson

Throughout the 1930s and ’40s, there was no greater saxophonist than Lester Young. Suave, sophisticated, cool, even in the face of overt bigotry, Young expanded the vocabul…
Back in 2001 (has it really been that long already?), bassist Charlie Haden released Nocturne, his finest album since 1992’s Haunted Heart. With a mostly Cuba…
Back in the 1970s, a mix of electric and acoustic instruments playing twisty heads and highly evolved improvised jams to hard-driving beats was called "jazz," or, more prec…
It’s funny how you can often tell a foreign musician from an American, even when they don’t sing with an accent. Astrud Gilberto, Stina, Bjork - they all sing with in a hyp…
Freedom demands control. The greater the freedom you seek, the greater the need for control.At least in music. The term "free jazz" may bring to mind a free-for-all - ho…
The three elements to jazz - three things that make music jazz as opposed to rock or folk or anything else - are the blues, improvisation and swing. And while one can pract…
Born out of the trauma of 9/11, Charles Lloyd’s new two-disc ECM recording, Lift Every Voice, is a remedy for the sabre rattling so coolly analyzed on the news each …
Skill and joy are in amply evidence on Phillips, Grier & Flinner’s sophomore release on Compass Records, Looking Back, the much-anticipated follow-up to their 1999 s…
By now, even if you haven’t heard Norah Jones sing, you’ve most likely heard of Norah Jones. She’s cut a few tracks on a few albums, been enjoying airplay and appearances o…
Rachelle Ferrell doesn’t like to call herself a jazz singer. She released her debut CD, First Instrument, in 1990 in Japan specifically to avoid being pigeonholed as…
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