Displaying items by tag: Traditional / New Orleans - jazzreview.com - Your Jazz Music Connection - jazzreview.com - Your Jazz Music Connection http://jazzreview.com Mon, 22 May 2017 10:41:01 -0500 Joomla! - Open Source Content Management en-gb Stephanie Jordan Tribute CD to Lena Horne http://jazzreview.com/new-jazz-releases/stephanie-jordan-tribute-cd-to-lena-horne.html http://jazzreview.com/new-jazz-releases/stephanie-jordan-tribute-cd-to-lena-horne.html Stephanie Jordan Sings a Tribute to the Fabulous Lena Horne; Yesterday When I Was Young: "Great lyrics permeate this beautifully rendered homage, and Jordan has the skill sets to do them justice—a voice that projects from a whisper to a scream, impeccable diction, dead-center pitch, fluid phrasing. Backed by a breathe-as-one 8-piece unit of top-shelf New Orleanians that sounds twice its size, and counterstated by a cohort of virtuoso soloists, she finds fresh, unfailingly swinging approaches to this well-traveled repertoire, melding into a personal argot elements garnered from such distinguished mentors as Shirley Horn, Abbey Lincoln, Nancy Wilson—and Lena Horne…

NEW ORLEANS – The long awaited debut album by New Orleans jazz vocalist Stephanie Jordan has finally arrived.  The Stephanie Jordan Big Band will host a CD Release Party at Café Istanbul during French Quarter Fest weekend in the Healing Center located at 2372 St. Claude Avenue, New Orleans. Louisiana on Friday, April 13, 2012 at 8:00 PM.  The new CD; "Stephanie Jordan Sings a Tribute to the Fabulous Lena Horne" honors the legendary Grammy Award winner who starred in many films and whose music has been hailed as masterpieces.

 

Noted jazz critic Ted Panken writes, "Great lyrics permeate this beautifully rendered homage, and Jordan has the skill sets to do them justice—a voice that projects from a whisper to a scream, impeccable diction, dead-center pitch, fluid phrasing. Backed by a breathe-as-one 8-piece unit of top-shelf New Orleanians that sounds twice its size, and counterstated by a cohort of virtuoso soloists, she finds fresh, unfailingly swinging approaches to this well-traveled repertoire, melding into a personal argot elements garnered from such distinguished mentors as Shirley Horn, Abbey Lincoln, Nancy Wilson—and Lena Horne herself—while sounding like no one other than Stephanie Jordan. As she aptly puts it, "it's a tribute, not a copy."

 

Panken continues, "The album's title track, Yesterday When I Was Young, a Charles Aznavour gem that Horne documented on the 1969 LP Lena and Gabor. Jordan's sodium pentothal treatment—the truth WILL be told—is evocative of the magical phrasing of Shirley Horn, a close friend of Jordan from her D.C. days."

 

The full album continues Jordan's signature treatment of jazz standards from the Big Band era performed with select solos by her father Edward "Kidd" Jordan; her brothers trumpeter Marlon and flutist Kent Jordan; and Uncle Maynard Chatters. Roderick Paulin's solo treatment on Stormy Weather is enchanting while Emmy Award recipient Mike Esneault provides musical utopia on the keys throughout the album.

 

Jordan's only regret is that Horne isn't around to hear this heartfelt offering. "I was two years into doing tributes to Lena, when she died," she says. "It was devastating to me. 

 

The full line-up of musicians includes; Mike Esneault, Arranger, Piano; Bobby Campo, Trumpet; Blake Daniels, Trumpet; Troy Davis, Drums and Percussions; Tony Dagradi, Baritone Sax; B.J. McGibney, Trombone; Roderick Paulin, Tenor Sax; Chris Severin, Bass; Maynard Chatters, Trombone; Steve Masakowski, Guitar; Edward "Kidd" Jordan, Tenor Sax; Kent Jordan, Flute; and Marlon Jordan, Trumpet.

 

"Jordan said that 16-years ago, a month long singing engagement in Istanbul, Turkey was the first time that she had traveled alone out of the US.  "It was then that I began to believe that she could be a professional jazz singer.  I remember thinking, wow; exotic places, worldwide travel, and glamorous surroundings, this could work.  At the Palace Hotel where I was residing for the performance hung a beautiful painting of New Orleans' own Sidney Bechet.  That confirmed that jazz was the route for me."  The reflections of that trip are the reasons why Jordan said she chose Café Istanbul as the site for her CD release.

 

Admission to this exclusive CD Release Party/Concert includes a free signed copy of the Stephanie Jordan Sings A Tribute to the Fabulous Lena Horne; Yesterday When I Was Young CD with the first 100 tickets purchased.

 

RSVP Online: http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?llr=4ei6xun6&oeidk=a07e5q2hqkgf72a97bf&oseq=a001ddv1te3k

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Vincent Sylvain) New Jazz Releases Mon, 02 Apr 2012 04:07:25 -0500
Always On My Mind by Alice & Björn http://jazzreview.com/free-jazz-mp3-downloads/always-on-my-mind-by-alice-bjorn.html http://jazzreview.com/free-jazz-mp3-downloads/always-on-my-mind-by-alice-bjorn.html A traditional slow swing song from Alice & Björn featuring Marty Keil on clarinet

A traditional slow swing song from Alice & Björn featuring Marty Keil on clarinet

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Alice and Björn) Free Jazz MP3 Downloads Fri, 03 Feb 2012 05:23:01 -0600
Don’t Bring Me Down, by The Heavyweights Brass Band http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/traditional-/-new-orleans-cd-reviews/dont-bring-me-down-by-the-heavyweights-brass-band.html http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/traditional-/-new-orleans-cd-reviews/dont-bring-me-down-by-the-heavyweights-brass-band.html Don’t Bring Me Down, by The Heavyweights Brass Band
One could alternately describe these five young Canadian musicians as a New-Orleans-style brass band, a funk band, an R&B band, or simply an eclectic group who play what pleases them. They're very good, versatile musicians, with a tight, well-rehearsed sound, clearly very much into the music that they're creating. So why has it taken me so much time to warm up to their debut album?

One could alternately describe these five young Canadian musicians as a New-Orleans-style brass band, a funk band, an R&B band, or simply an eclectic group who play what pleases them.  They're very good, versatile musicians, with a tight, well-rehearsed sound, clearly very much into the music that they're creating.  So why has it taken me so much time to warm up to their debut album?

I don't think it's that they don't understand what they're doing, because some songs sound great.  But in comparing them to Dirty Dozen Brass Band, or Rebirth Brass Band, they sound thin and emaciated.  However, look at the comparative sizes of the groups.  Other brass bands work with eight, ten, or twelve members.  The Heavyweights are trying for the same sound with five.  No wonder.  Another problem is that they attempt to do some songs that were done so well by the original artists that they can't help but pale by comparison.  If you're going to do "Beat It," "Why Can't We Be Friends," or "Just the Two of Us," you'd better bring something fresh and new to the table, or don't bother.  Sad to say, the Heavyweights aren't up to the task, either through sheer numbers, arrangements, or funky/smoothness.  

So, what do they do right?  The two funkiest songs, that are just delightful, are "Nueva Orleans" and "Rock Me," both featuring guest singers, Ogguere on the first, Saidah Baba Talibah on the second.  Ogguere is a Cuban singer/rapper, who combines his voice with the Heavyweights' significantly inspired New Orleans-style playing to arrive at something fresh and original.  With English/Spanish singing and banter, the guys take off and sound authentic.  Saidah Baba Talibah is a young Toronto-based R&B singer who moves the Heavyweights into a bluesy mode, and they play at a higher level than in most of their instrumental pieces.  What is it about the singers that makes them sound better?  Perhaps it's just the greater forces.  I don't think they're fated to be a backup group.  Paul Metcalfe and Jonathan Challoner have some fine solos on sax and trumpet, for example, in "The Plunge" and "Sexy Ways," where they carry the pieces very well.

I suspect that my reticence has something to do with, for lack of a better term, the squareness of their playing, especially on the New Orleans-style tunes and the covers.  It's not fair, perhaps to compare them to another Canadian group, the Diamonds, a 1950s vocal group who covered songs of several R&B groups for Mercury Records, but I will anyway.  The Diamonds' first hit was "Why Do Fools Fall in Love," competing on the charts with the far superior original by Frankie Lyman & the Teenagers.  It was terrible, the arrangement as dull as dishwater, without an ounce of soul.  After a year or so, they started to understand the style, and had a big hit with "Little Darlin'," a cover of a tune by the Gladiolas.  They got better, and they got better fast.  I suspect that once the Heavyweights figure out how to sound funkier, larger, and frankly, heavier, they will do just fine.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Jeff Wanser) Traditional / New Orleans - CD Reviews Sat, 31 Dec 2011 04:44:47 -0600
Putamayo Presents Jazz http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/jazz-vocals-cd-reviews/putamayo-presents-jazz.html http://jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/jazz-vocals-cd-reviews/putamayo-presents-jazz.html Putamayo Presents Jazz
Aficionados and neophytes alike should feel equally welcome when listening to Jazz, the accessible history lesson produced by Putamayo. Although this 12-song compilation presents an audio array that reaches as high as Blossom Dearie's top-shelf timbre on "They Say It's Spring," to the joint-jumping horns on Maxine Sullivan's " 'Taint No Use," the consistent core from start to finish remains a simple, steady swing that says plenty in a very limited time. For the aficionado, these classics are reminders about the art form's origins. For the neophyte, they serve as starting points that invite further exploration.

Aficionados and neophytes alike should feel equally welcome when listening to Jazz, the accessible history lesson produced by Putamayo. Although this 12-song compilation presents an audio array that reaches as high as Blossom Dearie's top-shelf timbre on "They Say It's Spring," to the joint-jumping horns on Maxine Sullivan's " 'Taint No Use," the consistent core from start to finish remains a simple, steady swing that says plenty in a very limited time. For the aficionado, these classics are reminders about the art form's origins. For the neophyte, they serve as starting points that invite further exploration.

For starters, all ears and feet get engaged immediately with the rolling piano and sashaying brushes/snare drum in-the-pocket work laid down by Albert "Tootie" Heath on Nina Simone's "My Baby Just Cares for Me." Simone's power comes from a diaphragm that emits a lush, full-bodied voice that still maintains full femininity. Simone's trio—which also includes bassist Jimmy Bonds—stays locked in on a catchy vamp even during her piano solo, and their release and the new swing they segue into at the song's climax makes this performance worth being called a classic.

Jazz really deserves the most appreciation when one realizes how much music is really played in such a limited time. This is first evident on the Nat King Cole Trio's "'Deed I Do." In a brisk, but still relaxed 2:15, listeners get treated to Cole's suave voice, his polished pianism that is featured in dialogue with guitarist Oscar Moore, and bassist Wally Prince, who presides over it all from the rear. To play so much music so well in such a short timeframe owing to that time period's recording-space limitations is a true testament to these cats' genius.

Although Jazz is a vocal-driven production—nine songs with vocals, three without—the instrumentalists whose singing is an added gift in their prodigious packages are also displayed. Let's consider Louis Armstrong and Chet Baker, whose external and internal axes are featured on "I Was Doing All Right," and "There Will Never Be Another You," respectively. On the former, "Satchmo" is joined by Oscar Peterson's quartet. After opening on his instrument for 16 tasty bars, Armstrong's voice—which always comes with a smile included free of charge—assumes its customary storytelling style. Armstrong's voice should really be appreciated when you consider the strain on the vocal chords that his style demanded.

Now listening to Chet Baker's light (almost femme) voice is a lesson in contrast. True, the trumpet is modest in volume, and the very straight vocal emphasizes the lyrics in an understated way, but Baker's beyond out-of-control lifestyle, documented in the 1988 film Let's Get Lost, makes one wonder how this lighter than light voice could come from such a soiled soul.

Although omitting Duke Ellington's numerous ensembles in this historical compilation may seem like a monumental error, there are two compositions from the maestro's pen included here: "It Don't Mean a Thing (If It Ain't Got That Swing)" co-written with Irving Mills, and "Don't Get Around Much Anymore," co-written with Bob Russell. Anita O'Day interprets the former in her intimate style, while Mose Allison takes his turn on the latter. Listeners really get to enjoy Allison's stream-of-consciousness-like humming that comes from him, especially in the song's opening verse. It almost sounds as if Mose is enjoying some really fine cuisine while singing and playing his piano.

There are three instrumentals on Jazz: Zoot Sims' "Someone to Watch Over Me," Hampton Hawes' "The Sermon," and Cannonball Adderley and Bill Evans' "Waltz for Debby." They are, naturally, excellent. Here, special mention will be given to the latter performance, which is the sweetest and most melodic. Evans, the song's co-writer, opens by laying flowers on the path for Cannonball, who then sings so well from his alto-playing soul while bassist Percy Heath and drummer Connie Kay keep it all simple and swinging.

Jazz concludes with Billie Holiday's "Lover Come Back to Me." Ray Brown prefaces Lady Day's plea by taking out his bow to make his doghouse bull-fiddle go deep into the blues of swing before the entire four-man ensemble, led by Oscar Peterson, lend their support. (Unfortunately, Joe Newman's trumpet is off-mic and not really felt.) Concluding this history lesson with this song proves to be an excellent choice when, to close her performance, Billie restates the title by inventing her own word as she goes, "Luv-ahhhhhhh...come back to me..." So much sizzle is present at this point that one can't help but see the wink and imagine the warmth that, no doubt, came with such a request.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Corey Hall) Jazz Vocals - CD Reviews Sun, 23 Oct 2011 16:01:34 -0500
Tuscia in Jazz Masterclass 2012 http://jazzreview.com/jazz-news/press-releases/annual-program-me.html http://jazzreview.com/jazz-news/press-releases/annual-program-me.html Upcoming masterclasses in Tuscia, Italy by Tuscia In Jazz.

Winter Masterclass from 3 to 5 Febraury 2012 – italy - Caprarola – Scuderie Palazzo Farnese.

Sax Mark Turner
Trumpet Avishai Cohen
Bass Joe Martin
Drums Marcus Gilmore
Voice Gegè Telesforo
Guitar Lucio Ferrara
Piano Domenico Sanna

euro 120 including 3 nights in the Ostel

Spring Masterclass from 5 to 9 April 2012 in Italy - Ronciglione – Viterbo.

Voice Jazz Gegè Telesforo
Sax Rick Margitza
Bass Ben Wolfe
Guitar Peter Bernstein 
Trumpet Flavio Boltro and Aldo Bassi
Drums Jeff Ballard and Gegè Munari
Hammond Alberto Marsico
Piano Antonio Ciacca

euro 200

Summer Masterclass from 23 to 29 July 2012 in Italy - Soriano nel Cimino

 

Pianoforte Aaron Goldberg
Sax Donnie McCaslin
Bass Scott Colley
Guitar Kurt Rosenwinkel
Trumpet Flavio Boltro
Drums Antonio Sanchez
Hammond Tony Monaco
Voice Jazz Shawnn Monteiro
Eletric Bass Pippo Matino
Combo 1 A turno tutti gli insegnati
Combo 2 Tony Monaco
Combo 3 Gege Munari and Giorgio Rosciglione
Arrangiamento e Composizione Antonio Ciacca

euro 400

Special discount for inscription visit

www.tusciainjazz.it

info italoleali@tusciainjazz.it tel. +39 393 9511130

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Tuscia In Jazz Festival) Press Releases Sun, 09 Oct 2011 04:08:01 -0500
Wynton Marsalis And Eric Clapton Play The Blues - Live From Jazz At Lincoln Center http://jazzreview.com/new-jazz-releases/wynton-marsalis-and-eric-clapton-play-the-blues-live-from-jazz-at-lincoln-center.html http://jazzreview.com/new-jazz-releases/wynton-marsalis-and-eric-clapton-play-the-blues-live-from-jazz-at-lincoln-center.html Wynton Marsalis And Eric Clapton Play The Blues
Reprise Records Presents Highlights From The Duo's Unprecedented, Sold-Out Jazz at Lincoln Center Performances; Also Features Special Guest Appearance By Taj Mahal

LOS ANGELES – New York City's premier jazz venue got the blues last April when Wynton Marsalis and Eric Clapton performed together in Rose Theater at Frederick P. Rose Hall, home of Jazz at Lincoln Center for two sold-out shows dedicated to vintage blues. The extraordinary collaboration, billed as Wynton Marsalis & Eric Clapton Play the Blues, paired these musical virtuosos with members of the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra as they brought to life a repertoire of songs selected by Clapton and arranged by Marsalis.

Reprise Records captures the magic of these unprecedented shows from earlier this year on CD and as a CD/DVD combo that both feature selections taken from the two public concerts (April 8-9), as well a special performance for Jazz at Lincoln Center's annual gala (April 7). Wynton Marsalis And Eric Clapton - Live From Jazz At Lincoln Center will be available September 13 at physical and digital retail outlets for suggested list prices of $18.98 (CD), $24.98 (CD/DVD) and $9.99 (digital; audio only). The DVD will also feature a bonus performance of the classic "Stagger Lee" from legendary bluesman Taj Mahal's opening solo set for these special shows.

Marsalis, Artistic Director of Jazz at Lincoln Center and nine-time Grammy® Award winner, writes about his collaboration with Clapton, a 19-time Grammy recipient, in the album's liner notes: "...we wanted these concerts to sound like people playing music they know and love, not like a project."

To help them achieve that level of devotion, Marsalis and Clapton were joined on stage by Dan Nimmer (piano), Carlos Henriquez (bass), Ali Jackson (drums), Marcus Printup (trumpet), Victor Goines (clarinet), Chris Crenshaw (trombone, vocals), Don Vappie (banjo) and Clapton's longtime keyboardist/sideman Chris Stainton. Marsalis says the group combined the sound of an early blues jump-band with the sound of New Orleans jazz to accommodate the integration of guitar/trumpet lead, a combination that gave the musicians the latitude to play different grooves, from the Delta to the Caribbean and beyond.

The band nimbly navigated a diverse set list that touched on different styles, from the four-on-the-floor swing of Louis Armstrong's "Ice Cream" and the southern slow-drag of W.C. Handy's "Joe Turner's Blues" to the traveling blues of "Joliet Bound" and the boogie-woogie jump of "Kidman Blues." After opening the shows with his solo set, Mahal returned to join the band on "Corrine, Corrina" and the New Orleans funeral standard "Just A Closer Walk With Thee."

The one song not selected by Clapton for the show was his own "Layla," which was requested by bassist Henriquez and arranged as a Crescent City dirge to tremendous results. On his review of the performance, David Fricke of Rolling Stone wrote: "In the [song's] instrumental break, Clapton hit a series of stabbing licks lightly crusted with distortion, followed by Marsalis' slow parade of clean hurting peals – a moving dialogue in lovesickness and blues routes."

Wynton Marsalis And Eric Clapton Play The Blues

Live From Jazz At Lincoln Center

CD and DVD Track Listing

1. "Ice Cream" (Louis Armstrong)

2. "Forty-Four" (Howlin' Wolf)

3. "Joe Turner's Blues" (W.C. Handy)

4. "The Last Time" (Louis Armstrong)

5. "Careless Love" (Bessie Smith)

6. "Kidman Blues" ("Big Maceo" Merriweather)

7. "Layla" (Eric Clapton)

8. "Joliet Bound" ("Kansas Joe" McCoy/"Memphis Minnie" McCoy)

9. "Just A Closer Walk With Thee" (ft. Taj Mahal) [Traditional]

10. "Corrine, Corrina" (ft. Taj Mahal) [Bo Chatmon/Mitchell Parish]

Bonus Track on DVD-only: "Stagger Lee" by Taj Mahal

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (1888 Media) New Jazz Releases Tue, 06 Sep 2011 15:38:27 -0500
Press Release: 2011 Tanglewood Labor Day Weekend Jazz Festival, September 2-4 http://jazzreview.com/jazz-news/press-releases/tanglewood-jazz-festival-2011.html http://jazzreview.com/jazz-news/press-releases/tanglewood-jazz-festival-2011.html 2011 Tanglewood Labor Day Weekend Jazz Festival, September 2-4 Judy Carmichael's Jazz Inspired with actress Blythe Danner and special guests from the worlds of Jazz, Broadway, and Hollywood to take place September 3 at 2pm Angelique Kidjo, Dianne Reeves, and Lizz Wright Featured in Sing the Truth with all-star band Geri Allen, Terri Lyne Carrington, James Genus, Munyungo Jackson, and Romero Lubambo on September 4 at 8pm A Latin Jazz Tribute to Cachao with Federico Britos Sextet and John Santos Sextet to take place September 3 at 8pm Coast to Coast Septet featuring NEA Jazz Master Jimmy Cobb with vocalist…

2011 Tanglewood Labor Day Weekend Jazz Festival, September 2-4

Judy Carmichael's Jazz Inspired with actress Blythe Danner and special guests from the worlds of Jazz, Broadway, and Hollywood to take place September 3 at 2pm

Angelique Kidjo, Dianne Reeves, and Lizz Wright Featured in Sing the Truth with all-star band Geri Allen, Terri Lyne Carrington, James Genus, Munyungo Jackson, and Romero Lubambo on September 4 at 8pm

A Latin Jazz Tribute to Cachao with Federico Britos Sextet and John Santos Sextet to take place September 3 at 8pm

Coast to Coast Septet featuring NEA Jazz Master Jimmy Cobb with vocalist Mary Stalings and the Mingues Orchestra with conductor NEA Jazz Master Gunther Schuller to Perform September 4, at 2pm

Festival Opens with Ulysses Quartet (6:30 pm) and the Robin McKelle Quartet and Michael Kaeshammer Sextet (8pm) on September 2

2011 NEA Jazz Masters Life award provides additional Festival Activities including Interviews with Jimmy Cobb and Gunther Schuller (9/3. At 4:15pm), Screening of Charles Mingus "Epitaph" (9/3, at 4:15pm), and Master Class with Jimmy Cobb and Coast to Coast Septet (9/4, at 12:30pm)

Taking place in conjunction with the annual Labor Day Weekend Jazz Festival, the Wine and Food Classic returns to Tanglewood September 1-4

The 24th annual Tanglewood Jazz Festival runs from Friday, September 2 to Sunday, September 4 at Tanglewood, the summer home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Held for the first time in conjunction with the Tanglewood Food and Wine Festival, the Labor Day weekend event will feature some of some of the greatest living artists of Jazz in the intimate Ozawa Hall, and introduce the rising stars of the musical genre in a Jazz Café on the 500-acre Tanglewood grounds in Lenox, Massachusetts.

This year's festival is highlighted by Grammy-award winning jazz vocalists Dianne Reeves and Angélique Kidjo, genre-defying vocalist Lizz Wright, NEA Jazz Masters Jimmy Cobb and Gunther Schuller, Judy Carmichael of NPR's Jazz Inspired, Hollywood actress and vocalist Blythe Danner, the legacy-bearing Mingus Orchestra, Afro-Latin percussionist John Santos with the John Santos Sextet, jazz/classical crossover violinist Federico Britos and the Federico Britos Sextet, boogie woogie pianist Michael Kaeshammer with the soulful vocalist Robin Mckelle, San Francisco legend Mary Stallings, and many more celebrated front runners of Jazz.

The festival will also feature many up-and-coming jazz artists including drummer and producer Ulysses Owens Jr., returning to Tanglewood after a 2010 premiere with Kurt Elling, French pianist Cedric Hanriot, returning after a 2009 Tanglewood performance, New York recording artist Sarah Manning in her Tanglewood debut, as well as cutting edge vocalist Rebecca Martin also performing for the first time at Tanglewood in the Jazz Café.

For complete season programs, ticket information, and downloadable press photos, please visit the Tanglewood Jazz Festival's online press kit at www.tanglewoodjazzfestival.org/presskit.

The Tanglewood Wine and Food Classic will take place September 1-4, in various locations around the Tanglewood grounds. The culinary event will feature wine and food seminars from local and national experts, a wine auction dinner, two grand tastings, and a Sunday brunch. Guests are invited to pair these world-class wine and food happenings with performances of the 2011 Tanglewood Jazz Festival. Ticket purchases to either Grand Tasting event come with a complimentary lawn ticket to the associated Jazz Festival concert. For more information please visit www.tanglewoodwineandfoodclassic.com.

2011 TANGLEWOOD JAZZ FESTIVAL WILL KICK IT OFF WITH A KICK DRUM—FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2 AT 6:30 PM

On Friday, September 4, at 6:30 pm, the 2011 Tanglewood Jazz Festival will open with the percussive Ulysses Owens Quintet in the Jazz Café. Owens is a Julliard-trained drums and percussion master whose classical background weds his comprehension of melody and harmony to his Jazz sensitivity. Currently touring with Grammy Award-winning vocalist Kurt Elling and bassist Christian McBride, Ulysses's latest CD, "It's Time For U," was released in 2009 by BSOBold Media.

NATIONAL ENDOWMENT OF THE ARTS BRINGS NEA JAZZ MASTERS JIMMY COBB AND GUNTHER SCHULLER TO TANGLEWOOD JAZZ FESTIVAL

After nearly a quarter century presenting the best of the genre, the Tanglewood Jazz Festival was honored to be selected as a participant in NEA Jazz Masters Live for the first time in 2011. The National Endowment for the Arts program has drawn NEA Jazz Masters Jimmy Cobb and Gunther Schuller to the Tanglewood grounds for a program of performances and residencies. These programs will include a master class for young drummers on Sunday, September 4 at 12:30 pm led by Jimmy Cobb and the rhythm section of the Coast to Coast Septet. At the same time across campus, NEA Jazz Masters Live will present a screening of the famed Charles Mingus concert "Epitaph," conducted by NEA Jazz Master Gunther Schuller. The monumental Mingus movie, never presented in full during Mingus' lifetime, lasts two and one-half hours and was performed at Tanglewood in 1990.

Also part of the Jazz Masters program, Jazz journalist Bob Blumenthal will conduct an intimate and rare interview with Jimmy Cobb and Gunther Schuller at 4:15 pm on Saturday in the Jazz Café. Schuller, who has been a presence at Tanglewood for decades, will discuss his work and relationship with legendary bassist Charles Mingus. Jimmy Cobb, the last surviving member of the Miles Davis masterpiece, "Kind of Blue," the most popular jazz recording in history, will discuss his prolific jazz career.

NEA Jazz Masters Live is a program of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with Arts Midwest.

JIMMY COBB JAMS WITH MARY STALLINGS AND THE COAST TO COAST SEPTET—SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 4 AT 2 PM

NEA Jazz Master Jimmy Cobb will also headline Ozawa Hall at the 2 pm Sunday-afternoon concert, with his Coast to Coast Septet and special guest vocalist Mary Stallings. Cobb, an elder statesman of the art, will perform with an all-star band including guitarist Peter Bernstein; trumpeter Sean Jones; trumpeter and flugelhornist Freddie Hendrix; tenor saxophonist Doug Lawrence; pianist Llew Matthews; and bassist John Weber.

Bay Area musician Mary Stallings has been entertaining audiences since the 1960's when Dizzy Gillespie once plucked her out of an audience to sing with his band. Stallings latest recording, "Dream," was released on High Note last year. Named "The Best Kept Secret in Vocal Jazz" by Jazz Times in December 2010, Stallings will perform music from the legendary career of Jimmy Cobb and his musical association with Dinah Washington, Billie Holiday, and Sarah Vaughan.

GUNTHER SCHULLER CARRIES ON CHARLES MINGUS LEGECY IN OZAWA HALL—SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 4 AT 2 PM

Following the Coast to Coast Septet on Sunday afternoon will be the Mingus Orchestra conducted by NEA Jazz Master and all-around music guru Gunther Schuller. The Mingus Orchestra was formed in 1999 to carry on the legacy of jazz great Charles Mingus. Its distinctive sound emerges from an expanded repertory and exotic instrumentation, including bassoon, bass clarinet, French horn, and guitar. Columbian harpist Edmar Castaneda will be among the personnel and the performance will include Taurus in the Arena of Life; Half Mast Inhibition; Noon Night; all arranged by Schuller for the event. Mr. Schuller will also present a world premiere of his arrangement of Chill of Death.

JAZZ INSPIRED WITH SPECIAL GUEST BLYTHE DANNER TO BE BROADCAST TO NATIONAL AUDIENCE—SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 3 AT 8 PM

Judy Carmichael and her radio program "Jazz Inspired" will debut at the Tanglewood Jazz Festival at 2 pm on Saturday, September 3. Carmichael's popular weekly radio program is broadcast on 170 stations throughout North America and abroad as well as on Sirius/XM Satellite Radio. Now in its 15th year, "Jazz Inspired" features Carmichael at the piano with a special guest from Hollywood, Broadway, or jazz. Her guest at this year's Tanglewood Jazz Festival is stage and screen actor Blythe Danner.

Known for her delightful sense of humor and exuberant personality, Carmichael earned a Grammy nomination for her recording "Two Handed Stride," has served on music panels for the National Endowment for the Arts, and is one of the few jazz pianists honored as a Steinway Artist. Ms. Danner earned a Tony Award for her Broadway debut in Butterflies Are Free and has received nominations for her roles in Harold Pinter's Betrayal, A Streetcar Named Desire,and Stephen Sondheim's Follies. Her film credits include Woody Allen's Alice, The Great Santini, Meet The Parents,and Sylvia with her daughter Gwyneth Paltrow. Ms. Danner will speak with Judy Carmichael about her life-long relationship with jazz, singing jazz in college with band mate Chevy Chase, and her friendship with the influential jazz pianist Bill Evans.

JOHN SANTOS AND FEDERICO BRITOS CELEBRATE ISRAEL LOPEZ CACHAO, "THE FATHER OF THE MAMBO"—SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 3 AT 8 PM

The John Santos Sextet—in a rare east coast performance—and the Federico Britos Sextet will perform "A Latin Jazz Tribute to Cachao" on Saturday at 8 pm in Ozawa Hall. Known as the "father of the mambo," the Cuban bassist Israel Lopez Cachao is revered by Latin music historians, musicians, and fans for revolutionizing Cuban music—first in the 1930s by creating and inventing the mambo from the Cuban musical form danzon—and later in the 1950s,during Cuban jam sessions. Cachao was the composer of "Chanchullo," on which Tito Puente based his classic hit "Oye Como Va," later made even more famous by Carlos Santana. John Santos and and Federico Britos were featured last September in the PBS/American Masters documentary "Cachao: Uno Mas."

Five-time Grammy nominee John Santos and his Sextet unite the contemporary, historical, and cultural significance of Latin jazz. A multi-percussionist, composer, historian, producer, and educator, Santos is a prolific exponent of Afro-Latin music through the innovative use of traditional forms and the instruments of contemporary music. In a career spanning four decades, he has worked with Dizzy Gillespie, Tito Puente, Max Roach, McCoy Tyner, Carlos Santana and dozens of other acknowledged masters. Santos toured with Maestro Cachao in the 1990s performing on bongos. Santos' band members include Saul Sierra, bassist; Marco Diaz, pianist; John Calloway, flautist; Melecio Magdaluyo, saxophonist/flautist; and David Flores, drummer/percussionist.

Violinist Federico Britos is a jazz/classical crossover artist of the highest order. Born in Uruguay, Britos served as principal chair, soloist, and concertmaster with some of the great symphony orchestras of Uruguay, Venezuela, Peru, Cuba, and the United States. He has performed with Astor Piazzolla, Cachao, and Joao Gilberto as well as with jazz legends Dizzy Gillespie, Duke Ellington, Nat King Cole, Benny Goodman, Bucky Pizzarelli, and Charlie Byrd. In 1999 Britos performed at the Kennedy Center in a program called "Americanos" with Cachao himself.

"SING THE TRUTH" CELEBRATION OF FEMALE VOCALISTS FEATURING DIANNE REEVES DRAWS FESTIVAL TO A CLOSE—SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 4 AT 8 PM

The closing concert of the 2011 Tanglewood Jazz Festival on Sunday, September 4, at 8:00 pm is titled "Sing the Truth: Angélique Kidjo, Dianne Reeves, and Lizz Wright Continue the Legacy of Great Women Vocalists at Tanglewood." This dynamic trio of today's leading jazz/world vocalists will feature the songs and music from past Tanglewood women artists including India Arie, Betty Carter, Tracy Chapman, Aretha Franklin, Shirley Horne, Mahalia Jackson, Carole King, Joni Mitchell, and Odetta.

To shine further light on this performance, increase general knowledge of jazz, and demystify the music for listeners new to the form, journalist Bob Blumenthal will also lead "Listen Here," a session on vocalists at 4:00 pm on Sunday, in the Jazz Café. "Listen Here" will focus on one album and the audience will be encouraged to discuss specific tracks, solos, instrumentation, personnel, etc. This session will concentrate on a recording by a female vocalist who represents the musical stylings of those featured in the Sunday-night "Sing the Truth" performance.

Born in Benin, West Africa, Angélique Kidjo is a Grammy-winning artist referred to as "Africa's premier diva" by Time Magazine. Her internationally acclaimed repertoire includes collaborations with such artists as Carlos Santana, Peter Gabriel, Alicia Keys, Josh Groban, Branford Marsalis, Joss Stone, and more. Known for her dynamic and uplifting music, she has translated her distinctive work in the arts to that of philanthropy by promoting education for girls in Africa through her foundation, Batonga, and as a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador.

Blue Note recording artist Dianne Reeves is one of the leading jazz vocalists in the world today, receiving the Grammy for Best Jazz Vocal Performance for three consecutive recordings—a Grammy first in any category. She has recorded and performed extensively with Wynton Marsalis and the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra, with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra conducted by Daniel Barenboim, and with Sir Simon Rattle and the Berlin Philharmonic. Reeves was the first Creative Chair for Jazz for the LA Philharmonic and the first singer to perform at the famed Walt Disney Concert Hall. Her latest CD, "When You Know," was released in 2008.

Lizz Wright has been the recipient of much critical acclaim and ever increasing audiences since her 2003 Verve debut recording, "Salt." The daughter of a Georgia pastor, Wright grew up singing in the church and her repertoire has included gospel, jazz, and blues as well as an eclectic mix of Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton, and Gladys Knight material.

CAFÉ ON MAIN – DEBUT CONCERT BRINGS JAZZ CAFÉ PERFORMERS TO THE OZAWA HALL STAGE—FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2 AT 8 PM

This year a debut concert dubbed "Café on Main" invites Jazz Café performers of previous years, to the much larger Ozawa Hall venue. On Friday, September 2 at 8 pm, Café on Main will feature a double bill with vocalist Robin McKelle and pianist/vocalist Michael Kaeshammer. Vocalist Robin McKelle is comfortable singing not only jazz tunes, but also soul, blues, pop, and rock. She earned her chops singing in R&B groups and touring with pop icons Michael McDonald and Bebe Winans. Her second CD, "Modern Antique" was ranked among the top jazz albums of 2008 and her latest CD, "Mess Around," features McKelle in a soul/blues setting. Michael Kaeshammer's boogie-woogie piano and lush vocals were first featured in the Jazz Café in 2009 and his acclaimed reception earned him a slot in this year's Café on Main. Since Kaeshammer's 2009 appearance, he has been touring extensively and just recorded his new CD, "Kaeshammer," which will be released in Canada in April. Kaeshammer's energy and enthusiasm are infectious, and his performances memorable.

JAZZ CAFÉ SHOWCASES THE RISING STARS OF THE JAZZ WORLD

As a distinctly American form that can't help but reinvent itself, Jazz has historically embraced the freshman of its form. Held in a tent next to the Highwood Manor House, the Jazz Café showcases some of the inspiring new talents of the Jazz world, in an improv-friendly setting.

The Jazz Café will open Saturday, September 3 at 12:30 pm with alto saxophonist Sarah Manning and her quartet. Manning has established herself as a unique voice among the young generation of jazz saxophonists. Originally from New England, she studied with Dr. Yusef Lateef, whose emphasis on searching for one's own voice in music gave her the courage to pursue her own path. Her latest CD, "Dandelion Clock," was released in 2010 on Posi-Tone Records.

At 6:30 pm on Saturday evening, the Cedric Hanriot Trio will take the stage in the Jazz Café. Hanriot is making an encore performance since appearing in the Jazz Café in 2009 with the Ben Powell Quartet. A Fulbright recipient, French pianist/composer Hanriot has appeared at the Iridium in New York, the Shanghai Jazz Festival, and the Jazz a Vienne Festival in France. He has worked with Grammy winner Siedah Garrett, drummer Terri Lyne Carrington, and bassist Me'shell NDegeocello among many others. Hanriot holds a master's degree in electronic engineering from the University of Nancy, France.

The final Jazz Café performance on Sunday at 6:30 pm will feature vocalist Rebecca Martin, whose spare, straightforward vocals have been heralded by the New York Times' as exuding, "the plainest sort of poise, almost radical in its utter lack of flash." Her latest CD on Sunnyside Records, "When I Was Long Ago," has earned high praise from critics. Martin will be joined by her husband, bassist Larry Grenadier, and saxophonist Bill McHenry.

TICKET INFORMATION

Tanglewood Jazz Festival tickets range from $18-77 and all-day jazz lawn passes for Saturday or Sunday are $34. Tickets are available through Tanglewood's website, www.tanglewood.org, by calling SymphonyCharge at 888-266-1200, or by visiting the Tanglewood Box Office at 297 West Street in Lenox, MA. Tickets are also available on the day of the concert at the Ozawa Hall Box Office on the Tanglewood Grounds. For further information and box office hours, please call the Boston Symphony Orchestra at 617-266-1492 or visit www.bso.org.

The online media partner for the Tanglewood Jazz Festival is Jazzcorner.com.

LABOR DAY WEEKEND JAZZ FESTIVAL, SEPTEMBER 2-4

Ozawa Hall Events

Friday, September 2, 8 p.m. Ozawa Hall

Robin McKelle Quartet

Michael Kaeshammer Quintet

Saturday, September 3, 2 p.m. Ozawa Hall

Live taping of the "Jazz Inspired" with host Judy Carmichael with special guest Blythe Danner

Saturday, September 3, 8 p.m. Ozawa Hall

A Latin Jazz Tribute to Cachao with Federico Britos Sextet and John Santos Sextet as featured in the "American Masters"/PBS documentary "Cachao: Uno Mas"

Sunday, September 4, 2 p.m. Ozawa Hall

Coast to Coast Sextet featuring NEA Jazz Master

Jimmy Cobb

Mingus Orchestra conducted by NEA Jazz Master

Gunther Schuller

Sunday, September 4, 8 p.m. Ozawa Hall

Sing the Truth: Celebrating the History of Women Vocalists at Tanglewood with Angélique Kidjo, Dianne Reeves, Lizz Wright and more

Jazz Café Events

All events below are free with an Ozawa Hall or Lawn Pass ticket

Friday, September 2, 6:30 pm

Ulysses Owens Quintet

Saturday, September 3, 11:30 am

Bob Blumenthal interviews John Santos

Saturday, September 3, 12:30 pm

Sarah Manning Quartet

Saturday, September 3, 4:15 pm

Bob Blumenthal interviews NEA Jazz Masters Jimmy Cobb and Gunther Schuller

Saturday, September 3, 6:30 pm

Cedric Hanriot Trio

Sunday, September 4, 12:30 pm

Master class with NEA Jazz Master Jimmy Cobb and the rhythm section of the Coast to Coast Septet

Screening of Charles Mingus' "Epitaph" conducted by Gunther Schuller at Lincoln Center in 1989

(This event will be held at the Highwood Manor House)

Sunday, September 4, 4 pm

"Listen Here" discussion with Bob Blumenthal on a recording by a legendary jazz vocalist to be announced

Sunday, September 4, 6:30 pm

The Rebecca Martin Trio with Larry Grenadier and Bill McHenry

For complete season programs, ticket information, and downloadable press photos, please visit the Tanglewood Jazz Festival's online press kit at www.tanglewoodjazzfestival.org/presskit.

# # #

TANGLEWOOD PRESS CONTACTS:

Bernadette Horgan, Director of Public Relations (bhorgan@bso.org) 617-638-9285

Kathleen Drohan, Associate Director of Public Relations (kdrohan@bso.org) 617-638-9286

Dawn Singh Publicity

Dawn Singh (dawn@dawnsinghpublicity.com) 617-765-4012

 

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (BSO Press) Press Releases Thu, 04 Aug 2011 12:05:35 -0500
Mike Portnoy's Dream Plays Out; Drummer Of The Year; Stanton Moore http://jazzreview.com/jazz-news/press-releases/a-variety-of-interesting-jazz-players-won-as-well.html http://jazzreview.com/jazz-news/press-releases/a-variety-of-interesting-jazz-players-won-as-well.html San Jose, Calif., — Mike Portnoy, considered one of the most powerful players in the world, has garnered his first “Drummer” Of The Year” award in Enter Music Publishing’s 16th Annual Drummies reader’s poll awards. Definitely a dream come true for Portnoy, he also took “Best Metal Drummer” and came in second place in the “Progressive Drummer” category. Addditionally, Stanton Moore won "Best Funk Drummer" for a second straight time.

Portnoy’s Prominence, or Rather, A Landslide

Portnoy succeeded in beating out some other highly regarded drummers in the “Drummer Of The Year” category. Benny Greb took second, Shadows Fall drummer Jason Bittner was third, Gavin Harrison of the prog-rock band Porcupine Tree came in at fourth, and Slipknot’s Joey Jordison took fifth place.

 

"It's amazing," said Phil Hood, co-founder and publisher of Enter Music Publishing, “that in a year in which Portnoy left his band, Dream Theater, he was selected by so many drummers. He became more well-known for leaving his group than he would have if he had stayed.”Harrison A Hit In Prog

Gavin Harrison, another highly regarded drummer also known for his association with King Crimson and other groups won “Progressive Drummer Of The Year” for the first time. Similar to Portnoy’s victories in the “Drummer Of The Year” and “Best Metal Drummer” categories, Harrison shared the category with some formidable competition with Portnoy again taking second place, Danny Carey coming in third, Portnoy’s Dream Theater replacement Mike Mangini in fourth, and Blake Richardson in fifth place.

 

Stanton Moore Steps Up As Best Funk Drummer For A Second Straight Year

Let’s face it. Stanton Moore is one of New Orleans’ most in-demand drummers, which is no easy feat on Bourbon Street. So, it should come as no surprise to anybody in the industry that he has taken “Best Funk Drummer” again. And as in the other drum categories, Moore faced stiff competition from veteran funksters and up-and-comers, strutting past David Garibaldi, Dennis McKenzie, Dennis Chambers, and Chris Coleman.

 

“Stanton gets down and is considered a Cresent City great,” Hood said. “He definitely is a master of second-line drumming in its traditional sense and in contemporary settings.”

 

 

Travis Barker Tops Mainstream Pop

Barker is certainly no stranger to the Drummies. He has won numerous “Best Drummer” awards and in February 2011 was inducted into DRUM!’s hall of fame for his five wins in the “Best Punk Drummer” category. So far in 2011, his career is right on track. That’s why his victory as “Best Mainstream Pop” drummer is no surprise. Barker beat out Dominic Hayward, Daniel Adair, Rian Dawson, and Taylor Hawkins.

 

There were plenty of other fascinating additions to the 16th Annual Drummies List."This year many new faces got votes and finished as winners or runners-up," said Dave Constantin, managing editor of Enter Music Publishing. “Artists like newcomer Arin Ilejay of Avenged Sevenfold, who won ‘Rising Star Of The Year,’ led a field of young drummers who entered the running for the first time.”

A Field Of First-Time Winners


Kris Myers of Umphrey’s McGee won for the first time in the “Jam Band” category, beating out stalwarts such as Butch Trucks of the Allman Brothers and John Fishman of Phish. Additionally, Dominic Howard, drummer of the huge chart-topping band Muse, was a first-time winner in the “Alternative Rock” category, and Tony Royster Jr. won in the “Urban/Hip-Hop” category. Also in the urban category was Aaron Draper, who has played with Common, Jill Scott, LL Cool J, and others, and walked off with a convincing victory in the “Live Performer Of The Year” category.

 

Rich Redmond of country hit maker Jason Aldean was a surprise winner in country. Benny Greb, well-known for his outstanding video from Hudson Music, was “Clinician Of The Year,” and the perpetually in-demand Josh Freese was an overwhelming choice for “Studio Drummer Of The Year.”

Hand Percussion Slaps As Well
A wide range of styles were represented in the hand percussion categories with Karl Perazzo of Santana taking “Percussionist Of The Year.” Umphrey’s McGee percussionist Andy Farag won the “Rising Star” award, and Jesús Diaz captured two awards for “Worldbeat” and “Percussion Clinician Of The Year.”

 

Products, Products, Products

Hundreds of drum products received votes in 12 different categories, from “Best Stick” to “Best Percussion Accessory.” Leading vote-getters included Tama’s Superstar drum set, Mapex’ Black Panther snare drum line, and Zildjian’s 22" K Constantinople Bounce Ride cymbal.

 

Record Returns For A Second Straight Year

Enter Music Publishing experienced record-breaking voting returns in the 16th Annual Drummies. According to Surveymonkey, approximately 8,500 drummers cast 100,000 votes in the 42 categories that comprise the Drummies, as compared to the 6,500 who participated last year.

 

As previously reported, Enter Music Publishing attempted to alert drummers from a wide variety of backgrounds to participate this year through marketing and PR. The news was spread via email blasts, forum postings, and syndication through top music news sites. This pro-activity resulted in the record voting this year.

 

Enter Music Publishing would like to congratulate all the winners in the 16th Annual Drummies and thank all the drummers, other musicians, and fans who participated.

 

For a complete listing of all the winners, visit www.drummagazine.com/drummies. Those who are interested can find out there who won everything from “Best Drumming Web Site” to “Best Cymbal.”

 

About Enter Music Publishing
Founded in San Jose, California in 1992, Enter Music Publishing, Inc., is a leading publisher of drum/percussion magazines, with distribution in 40 countries. DRUM! is the flagship publication of Enter Music Publishing, Inc., and continues to set the industry standard for editorial quality and innovation. Enter Music Publishing, Inc., also publishes great content on its Web site, drummagazine.com. Over the company’s history, Enter Music Publishing has pressed other well-respected publications, such as How To Play Drums, and TRAPS magazines. The company’s mission is to be the best source of drumming news and info on this planet (and others as they become populated.) The company’s founders, Phil Hood and Andy Doerschuk, are well-respected drum industry veterans with more than 50 years of experience in the field.

 

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Josh Moscov) Press Releases Sun, 10 Jul 2011 16:21:21 -0500
Filmmaker Ken Burns And Tauck To Host Exclusive Jazz Event In New Orleans http://jazzreview.com/jazz-news/press-releases/filmmaker-ken-burns-and-tauck-to-host-exclusive-jazz-event-in-new-orleans.html http://jazzreview.com/jazz-news/press-releases/filmmaker-ken-burns-and-tauck-to-host-exclusive-jazz-event-in-new-orleans.html Filmmaker Ken Burns, whose 10-part documentary "Jazz" was honored with a 2001 Television Critics Association Award, is teaming with travel industry leader Tauck to offer an all-inclusive jazz event in New Orleans. The event, to be held October 5 – 9, will trace the roots and evolution of jazz, include private performances by Ellis Marsalis and other musicians, and be highlighted by a keynote address delivered by Burns.

Five-Day Event To Feature Private Performance By Ellis Marsalis, Special Lecturers And Insider Access At Iconic Sites

NORWALK, CT (June 14, 2011)  Private performances by musicians including Ellis Marsalis...  VIP treatment and a private concert at Preservation Hall...  Exclusive talks from Ken Burns and the music historian at the Louisiana State Museum...  An insider's tour of  the Hogan Jazz Archive hosted by its curator...  Gourmet meals at some of New Orleans' most renowned restaurants, including Arnaud's and The Court of Two Sisters...

All of these experiences and more will be featured during a new five-day event in New Orleans exploring the birth and evolution of jazz.  The event is the product of a partnership between Tauck, an 86-year-old leader in premium quality guided tours, and the documentary filmmaker Ken Burns, whose 10-part film "Jazz" was honored with the 2001 Television Critics Association Award for Outstanding Achievement, News & Information.  Not only did Burns work closely with Tauck in crafting the itinerary, he will also deliver the keynote address at the event, to be held October 5 – 9.

"Jazz and New Orleans are inseparable; you can't fully tell the story of one without telling the story of the other," said Burns.  "The best way to understand and appreciate this uniquely American art form is to explore it and experience it surrounded by the actual places, the history and the culture that gave birth to it."

To take full advantage of the event's New Orleans location, Tauck has arranged a number of exclusive "insider" experiences at area sites and enlisted local musicians and other experts, according to company CEO Dan Mahar.  "For 86 years, Tauck has specialized in delivering experiences that our guests can't get on their own," said Mahar.  "The line-up we've put together with Ken makes this a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for anyone interested in jazz, from the casual listener to the hard-core fanatic."  Mahar added that capacity is limited to 300 attendees, and that the event is expected to sell out quickly.  Earlier this spring, Tauck announced a similarly crafted, five-day Ken Burns event exploring the Civil War in Washington, DC, and it sold out completely in just 10 days.

Guests attending the Burns-Tauck jazz event will be treated to private, closed performances by renowned musician Ellis Marsalis at the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts, by saxophonist, singer and composer Donald Harrison at the Ritz-Carlton hotel, and by a local jazz combo at the iconic, historic Preservation Hall.   Along with Ken Burns's keynote address, other presentations will be offered by curator Bruce Boyd Raeburn at Tulane's Hogan Jazz Archive; by Charles Chamberlain, Music Historian for the Louisiana State Museum; by National Park Service ranger and musician Bruce "Sunpie" Barnes; and by writer and documentary film producer Lolis Eric Elie.  Other activities during the event will include a welcome dinner at Arnaud's, guided explorations of key venues from the history of jazz, a jazz brunch at The Court of Two Sisters, and a gala farewell dinner cruise and performance by the Dukes of Dixieland aboard the steamboat Natchez. 

Ellis Marsalis, patriarch of "America's first family of jazz" and one of the event's performers, expressed his strong enthusiasm for the itinerary.  "I've been playing jazz for more than 60 years, I've been a music educator on-and-off for over 40, and this trip combines my two passions," said Marsalis.  "Anyone coming to New Orleans for this event will hear a lot of really great jazz, they'll gain a better appreciation for the music and its heritage, and they'll have a great time to boot."

THEMED SIGHTSEEING MODULES

Each full day of the itinerary will examine a different facet of jazz, with the event's 300 attendees splitting into small groups of 30 to experience a series of private, interactive, guided sightseeing modules, each related to a central daily theme.  Themes to be explored on selected days include "The Roots of Jazz," with special guided visits to Basin Street Station, the Storyville red-light district, the Louisiana State Museum Jazz Collections, and Tulane University's Hogan Jazz Archive.  Another day's theme will highlight "Jazz in the Quarter" during a tour of the French Quarter's historic Cabildo with Louisiana State Museum Music Historian Charles Chamberlain and a private day-time performance at Preservation Hall.  A final module, "Jazz & the Story of Survival Today," will explore the impact of Hurricane Katrina on New Orleans' music scene in the historic Treme neighborhood as well as music's subsequent role in New Orleans' recovery.

Guests attending the Tauck-Ken Burns jazz event will enjoy accommodations at the five-star Ritz-Carlton, New Orleans.  Prices for the event start at $3,490 per person, double occupancy, plus air, and include admission to all daytime sightseeing and evening events, all entertainment, most meals, luggage handling, hotel transfers in New Orleans, and more.  Those interested in additional information should contact their local travel professional, visit Tauck online at www.tauck.com, or call 1 800 468 2825.

ABOUT KEN BURNS.  Ken Burns has been making documentary films for over 30 years.  His films have garnered 12 Emmys and two Oscar nominations, and set viewership records at PBS.  Burns has been honored by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences with its Lifetime Achievement Award, and he is the recipient of more than 25 honorary degrees. 

ABOUT THE KEN BURNS FILM "JAZZ."  Originally broadcast in January, 2001, "Jazz" was honored with the 2001 Television Critics Association Award for Outstanding Achievement, News & Information, and the 2001 ASCAP President's Award, Outstanding Television Documentary.  In all, the film and its accompanying soundtrack and book received nearly 20 honors, including five Emmy Award nominations. 

ABOUT TAUCK.  Tauck has been a leader in guided travel since its launch in 1925.  Family-owned and operated, Tauck offers nearly 100 premium-quality land journeys, small ship cruises, family travel adventures, and active, immersive small-group travel experiences in 65 countries and all seven continents.  The company has won over 60 awards for quality, innovation and leadership, including being named the "World's Best Tour Operator" by a number of consumer and trade publications. 

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Tom Armstrong) Press Releases Tue, 14 Jun 2011 09:08:42 -0500
Preservation Hall http://jazzreview.com/book-reviews/preservation-hall.html http://jazzreview.com/book-reviews/preservation-hall.html In computer lingo WYSIWYG is What You See Is What You Get. In PRESERVATION HALL it's What You See is the Musicians - JAZZ men that SWING in the TRADITION and in the MOMENT. That's the theme, published by Louisiana State University Press, that's played out by 45 seminal and youthful New Orleans style musicians in time for a 50th Anniversary Celebration. And, Expressive, richly colored, photographs by Shannon Brinkman of their own environment.

PRESERVATION HALL – New Orleans in Pictures and Words

In computer lingo WYSIWYG is What You See Is What You Get. In PRESERVATION HALL it's What You See is the Musicians - JAZZ men that SWING in the TRADITION and in the MOMENT. That's the theme, published by Louisiana State University Press, that's played out by 45 seminal and youthful New Orleans style musicians in time for a 50th Anniversary Celebration.

And, Expressive, richly colored, photographs by Shannon Brinkman of their own environment.

And, their words in explanation of themselves as they evolved from the tradition, captured by Eve Abrams.

Prominent is the place - PRESERVATION HALL - a room full of antiquity, heritage, of the players caught in stop-time.

The interviews reflect the experience of these musicians. The bios reveal the path each took to Preservation Hall. Enjoy the nicknames as well as the portraits of the jazz instruments. - Daniel Kassell All Rights Reserved, Member, Jazz Journalist Association


Preview a sample of Shannon Brinkman’s photos on flicker:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/preservationhall/sets/72157622019723431/

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Dan Kassell) Book Reviews Fri, 03 Jun 2011 08:11:34 -0500